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Air Medal With "V" Device

Interesting Notes:

* Denotes Posthumous Award

ADAMS, GARY A.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
C Company, 5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Ready
Date of Action: 8 March 2010
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, The Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Sergeant Gary A. Adams. For exceptionally heroic achievement while serving as a DUSTOFF Flight Medic on 8 March 2010 during an Urgent Point of Injury MEDEVAC mission in support of Operation Enduring Freedom 10. SGT Adams’ extraordinary dedication and selfless service on this dangerous, life-saving mission resulted in the safe and rapid evacuation of one critically wounded Marine and reflects great credit upon him, Task Force Ready, Task Force Pegasus, United States Forces-Afghanistan, and the United States Army. SEE CPT CONNELLY’S NARRATIVE BELOW FOR A DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THIS MISSION.
General Orders: Permanent Order number unknown, Approved 1 December 2012 by MG, DCDR, USFOR-A

ARCHER, BRANDON J.
Captain, U.S. Army
Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force-10
Date of Action: 12 February 2014
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, The Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Captain Brandon J. Archer for exceptionally valorous service as an Air Mission Commander in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on 12 February 2014. Captain Archer’s remarkable ability to perform duties in the face of danger made a lasting impression. Through his distinctive accomplishment, his actions reflect great credit upon himself, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Dorce-10, and the United States Army.

Narrative to accompany the award:
CPT Brandon Archer, United States Army, displayed unbelievable tactical and technical competence, heroism, and valor in his performance as an Aeromedical evacuation (MEDEVAC) Pilot-In-Command (PC) and Air Mission Commander (AMC) during Operation Enduring Freedom XV. On 12 February 2014, CPT Archer was instrumental in the evacuation of casualties assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group, Special Operations Task Force-Northeast (SOTF-NE), Kapisa Province, Afghanistan. The Special Forces elements were engaged by Afhgan Nation Army insider attacks in Taqab District, resulting in four urgent surgical casualties requiring immediate medical evacuation. As the AMC for MEDEVAC mission MM€ 02-12D, CPT Archer was responsible for the command and control of two HH-60M helicopters. Intelligence reports identified the Tagab district as a high threat area. Upon arrival into the Tagab district, his team immediately received small arms fire while orbiting near the landing zone (LZ) as they waited for their sister helicopter to depart. After conducting evasive maneuvers, CPT Archer vectored an Attack Weapons Team (AWT) toward a suspicious vehicle and its occupants who were posing a threat to his team. CPT Archer committed to the approach into the LZ, knowing any delay would drastically reduce the chances of survival for the critically injured Soldiers. On short final into the LZ, CPT Archer’s aircraft received significant small-arms fire from multiple directions. Approximately 100 rounds of effective enemy fire were used in the enemy’s attempt to accomplish their objective-shooting down a Coalition Force aircraft. CPT Archer maneuvered his aircraft through the complex attack and landed safely in an extremely confined LZ bordered by a three story building on one side, and seven foot walls on the other three, with no greater than a ten foot clearance on each side. Additionally, CPT Archer advised ground elements of the enemy position 100m away; resulting in a successful engagement and attrition of four additional enemy combatants. CPT Archer managed the entirety of the mission for his MEDEVAC team, communicated with multiple entities on the radios, and expertly flew the aircraft through a highly kinetic area. CPT Archer’s entire crew willingly exposed themselves to enemy fire in order to execute their life-saving mission without personal regard for their own safety. His actions reflect great credit upon him, Eagle DUSOFF, Task Force Lift, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force 10, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 057-002, Headquarters, CJTF-10 (CJ1), 26 February 2014

BARONE, THOMAS M.
First Sergeant, U.S. Army
Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force-10
Date of Action: 12 February 2014
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, The Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to First Sergeant Thomas M. Barone for valorous achievement as an Flight Medic in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on 12 February 2014. First Sergeant Barone’s remarkable ability to perform duties in the face of danger made a lasting impression. Through his distinctive accomplishment, his actions reflect great credit upon himself, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Dorce-10, and the United States Army.

Narrative to accompany the award:
First Sergeant Thomas Barone, United States Army, showed unwavering heroism and valor as an Aeromedical Evacuation Medic on 12 February 2014, while evacuating the wounded in support of the 9-Line MEDEVAC request by Special Operations Task Force Northeast, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (2-3) in the Tigab Valley, Kapisa Province, Afghanistan, during Operation Enduring Freedom XV. He was the medic in charge of DUSTOFF 35 (DO35) launched from Bagram Airfield. 1SG Barone performed aircraft surveillance on the flight through the complex battle space in route to the known hostile area of the Tagab Valley. When the crew received the mission, 1SG Barone sprinted to the aircraft to prepare the cabin to accept at least three critically wounded U.S. patients, who needed to be evacuated immediately. The Special Operations Soldiers were still in contact during the MEDEVAC request and there was a potential to receive more than the original six that were requested. Once the aircraft arrived to the LZ location, it was determined that there was barely enough room for one Blackhawk. The crew immediately gained altitude and departed towards the east once the aircraft reached 400’ AGL, the CMWS declared Rocket and Flares dispensed. Immediately, the PI observed small arms fire from the three o’clock to the five o’clock positio0n with numerous rounds directed at the aircraft. The PC performed evasive maneuvers immediately to avoid the small arms fire. The PC notified the AH-64 element immediately that the crew was waiting to go into the LZ to pick up the remainder of the wounded U.S. Soldiers. DUSTOFF 32 took off and then DUSTOFF 35 started their approach to the LZ. Upon short final on the approach to the LZ, 1SG Barone witnessed three insurgents, all with AK-47s, which began to engage the aircraft with rounds directed right at the medic’s seat and pilots door. 1SG Barone immediately directed the pilot on the controls to maneuver away from the incoming fire as the barrage of small arms rounds and tracers passed within less than a foot of the aircraft, exiting through the rotor system. At the same time, the crew chief announced he was also being engaged from the right side of the aircraft. The aircraft was committed to landing at 70’ AGL, and 40 knots. Without regard for his own personal safety, 1SG Barone continued to expose himself to the enemy fire and provided critical directions that enabled the PC to safely land in the tight landing zone. As the aircraft landed, 1SG Barone immediately exited the aircraft on the right side and began to help load the critically injured Soldiers. While he was securing the patients, he heard constant gunfire coming from various directions. Arriving at the Role III at Bagram, 1SG Barone’s efforts had paid off as DO35 delivered the patients in stable condition and setting the conditions for higher medical care. 1SG Barone’s actions under direct enemy fire that day resulted in the evacuation and survival of two cortically wounded Special Forces Soldiers. The entire crew willingly exposed themselves to the enemy and continued on their life-saving mission without regard to their own safety. His actions reflect great credit upon Eagle DUSOFF, Task Force Lift, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force-10, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 057-001, Headquarters, CJTF-10 (CJ1), 26 February 2014

CAMMACK, BRIAN
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 18 September 2011
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158 dated 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Staff Sergeant Brian Cammack, Army Medical Department, United States Army. Staff Sergeant Cammack, a Flight Medic assigned to Company C, Task Force Phoenix, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division distinguished himself for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force on 18 September 2011 in the vicinity of Pech Valley, Afghanistan. On that date SSG Cammack and his team were performing a medical evacuation mission when they received the call to pick up a patient in Pech Valley, an area which required the medevac teams to use a hoist from the helicopter to retrieve patients. As the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter hovered over the patient’s location, SSG Cammack began to hoist down when the crew started to take accurate small arms fire. The crew quickly brought SSG Cammack back on board. The medevac team returned to FOB Fenty, and because of the damage to the aircraft, switched to another helicopter and resumed their mission. Staff Sergeant Cammack was lowered from the hoist to the patient and was able to secure and bring him up to the Black Hawk. During the course of the night, Staff Sergeant Cammack retrieved, treated and transferred three more patients. Staff Sergeant Cammack’s heroic actions and determination in this hazardous situation were in keeping of the finest traditions of the Army Medical Department and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Personal Order number unknown
Home of Record: West Bend, Wisconsin

CAMPBELL, JOSEPH S.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
C Company, 7-101st, Task Force Lift
Date of Action: 12 February 2014
 Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158 dated 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Sergeant Joseph S. Campbell, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for valorous achievement as a Flight Medic in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on 12 February 2014. Sergeant Campbell’s remarkable ability to perform duties in the face of danger made a lasting impression. Through his distinctive accomplishment, his actions reflect great credit upon himself, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force-10, and the United States Army.

Narrative to accompany the award:
SGT Joseph Campbell, United States Army, displayed exceptional courage and technical competence as an Aeromedical Evacuation Flight Medic (MO) on 12 February 2014, while evacuating wounded in support of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group of Special Operations Task Force – Northeast, Kapisa Province, Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom XV. The Special Forces team was engaged by Afghan National Army insider attacks in Taqab District, resulting in four urgent surgical casualties requiring immediate medical evacuation. As the Flight Medic on DUSTOFF 32, SGT Campbell worked closely with the enroute critical care nurse to prepare supplies and equipment to support urgent surgical patients as they executed MEDEVAC mission MM€ 02-12D. His professionalism, expertise, and calm demeanor allowed the aircrew to successfully ingress into the Taqab valley through his situational awareness of the AH-64 air weapons team location and obstacle clearance instruction to facilitate a safe landing into an extremely constrictive landing zone (LS). Upon landing, SGT Campbell exited the aircraft and conducted patient handover with Special Forces elements at the LZ. During the loading sequence, Special Forces elements continued to engage enemy at the LZ, providing security for the aircraft, crew, and casualties. After loading the patient and departing the LZ, SGT Campbell began continued treatment of the casualties. His abilities to quickly assess the required care for each patient directly resulted in their survival during transport to Bagram. His text-book application of rapid trauma survey and established medical protocols resulted in the identification of additional life threatening combat injuries that were not initially assessed by ground medical personnel. Following the completion of the mission, post flight inspections identified that SUSTOFF 32 was engaged by small arms fire and received damage to two main rotor blades, the left half of the stabilator, and the tail rotor intermediate gear box cover. The entire crew willingly exposed themselves to the enemy and continued on their life saving mission without regard to their own safety. SGT Campbell’s actions reflect great credit upon him, Eagle DUSTOFF, Task Force Lift, Task Force Thunder, Combined Joint Task Force-10, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 057-004, Headquarters, CJTF-10 (CJ1), 26 February 2014

CHANDLER, MATTHEW J.
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
Joint Task Force
Date of Action: 15 May 2015 to 16 May 2015
Synopsis: Citation Write-Up Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158 dated 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Sergeant First Class Matthew J. Chandler, Army Medical Department, United States Army. For Exceptionally valorous achievement during aerial flight as a flight medic for a Joint Task Force in support of overseas contingency operations pm 15 and 16 May 2015. During this period, Sergeant Chandler went above and beyond the call of duty to execute a classified, high risk mission deep inside enemy territory under zero illumination and harsh environmental conditions. Through his distinctive accomplishments, Sergeant First Class Chandler reflected great credit upon himself, this command, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Personal Order number 159-023, 8 June 2015

CONNELLY, MICHAEL K.
Captain, U.S. Army
C Company, 5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Ready
Date of Action: 8 March 2010
Synopsis: Citation Write-Up Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158 dated 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Captain Michael K. Connelly, Army Medical Department, United States Army. Captain Connelly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous achievement to the United States as a UH-60 MEDEVAC Pilot and Team Leader for C Company, 5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, United States Forces-Afghanistan, on 8 March 2010, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom 10. CPT Connelly demonstrated exemplary heroism and courage in the line of fire on an Urgent MEDEVAC mission to a hot Landing Zone (LZ) to evacuate a Marine of the Special Operations Task Force-81 with a gunshot wound to the head. At approximately 0650, CPT Connelly’s crew, DUSTOFF 83 (DO83), received the Urgent 9 Line request from Dagger 22, a dismounted ground force in a fire fight with 20-30 highly motivated enemy insurgents approximately 4 km north of Bala Morghab, Afghanistan. Within minutes, CPT Connelly had his aircraft and crew ready for launch. By 0705, DO 83 and chase aircraft Black Magic 20 (BM 20) still had not received approval to launch. Knowing just how desperate the situation on the ground was and the increasing likelihood that the critically injured Marine would not survive, CPT Connelly made the difficult decision to launch ahead of approval. Both crews departed FOB Todd traveling at 120 knots while maintaining flight below 100 feet en route to the point of injury. Moments later, on short final to the hot LZ, CPT Connelly and his crew began drawing heavy small arms and machine gun fire from the insurgent forces. Even as they observed Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPG) impacting the ground just off the nose of the aircraft, COPT Connelly continued his approach. With Dagger 22 and chase aircraft BM 20 laying down suppressive fires, he skillfully maneuvered his aircraft safely to the ground. With his Crewchief and Flight Medic outside of the aircraft loading the patient, enemy fire intensified. A hail of machine gun fire and RPGs impacted the ground approximately 10-20 meters from the aircraft. CPT Connelly chose to remain on the LZ until the patient and his crews were safely onboard. Once the patient was secured, he departed for the Forward Surgical Team at FOB Todd once again drawing enemy fire away from the ground forces. With the enemy’s focus on the departing aircraft, Dagger 22 gained freedom to maneuver and a tactical advantage over the determined enemy. DO 83 and BM 20 arrived safely back to FOB Todd minutes later safely delivering the critically wounded Marine to the FST for lifesaving medical intervention. This mission was executed with than 10 minutes of planning, unarmed, to a hot LZ fraught with numerous hazards to aviation operations and under fire from a dangerous and determined enemy. CPT Connelly and his crew readily accepted risks beyond those asked of, or expected for other aviation assets in theater because of the criticality of the patient awaiting evacuation. Their quick action and disregard for their own personal safety saved the life of a critically injured Marine while rallying the ground forces to defeat the enemy. CPT Connelly demonstrated extraordinary dedication and leadership as a UH-60 MEDEVAC Pilot and Team Leader throughout a complex and dangerous mission. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect distinct credit upon him, Task force Ready, Task force Pegasus, United States Forces-Afghanistan, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order 091-18, United States Army Human Resources Command, 1 April 2015

ROMERO, ELENA
Sergeant, U.S. Army
10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 7 November 2011
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158 dated 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Sergeant Elena Romero, Army Medical Department, United States Army. Sergeant Romero, a Flight Medic assigned to Company C, Task Force Phoenix, 10th Combat Aviation Brigade, 10th Mountain Division distinguished herself for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force on 7 November 2011 in the vicinity of Konar Valley, Afghanistan. On that date Sergeant Romero and her team received an urgent medical evacuation mission in Konar Valley. She was wounded while the crew was trying to land the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter to pick up injured Soldiers November 7, 2011.  Throughout the mission, the aircraft took small-arms fire. Despite the danger and the wounds she suffered, Romero pulled the injured Soldier on board the helicopter and managed to stabilize the Soldier to transport him to Jalabad Airfield, where the Soldier received life-saving medical care.  Staff Sergeant Romero’s heroic actions and determination in this hazardous situation were in keeping of the finest traditions of the Army Medical Department and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Personal Order number unknown
Home of Record: Vernon, New Jersey