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Air Medal With "V" Device

Interesting Notes:

* Denotes Posthumous Award

BECKER, FREDERICK W.
Chief Warrant Officer, CW2, U.S. Army
236th Medical Detachment (HA), 44th medical Brigade
Date of Action: 3 March 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Regulation 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer CW2 Frederick W. Becker for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Chief Warrant Officer Becker distinguished himself by heroic actions on 3 march 1969 while serving as a pilot of an air ambulance on a rescue mission twenty-five miles west of Chu Lai. Upon arriving over the scene of the action where another “dustoff” aircraft had just minutes earlier been shot down, CW2 Becker was advised that the ground element was in heavy contact with a large enemy force. After coordinating the armed helicopter escort, he initiated his approach into the insecure pick-up site. Approaching the site the aircraft came under intense enemy fire; however, the landing was completed. Upon touchdown the aircraft again came under fire, but the “dustoff” remained on the ground until all of the inured plus the crew of the downed “dustoff” ship were on board. Only then did he take-off. After lift off the enemy again directed a heavy volume of fire at the aircraft. Using evasive maneuvers the enemy positions were avoided. CW2 Becker’s courage under fire, excellent flying ability, and complete devotion to duty were directly responsible for the saving of six lives and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 20, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 9 January 1970

BOWEN, GAIL O.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
44th medical Brigade
Date of Action: 3 March 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Regulation 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Major Gail O. Bowen, Medical Service Corps, for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Major Bowen distinguished himself by heroic actions while serving as aircraft commander of an air ambulance on a rescue mission twenty-five miles west of Chu Lai. Upon arriving over the scene of the action where another “dustoff” aircraft had just minutes earlier been shot down, Major Bowen was advised that the ground element was in heavy contact with a large enemy force. After coordinating the armed helicopter escort, he initiated his approach into the insecure pick-up site. Approaching the site the aircraft came under intense enemy fire; however, the landing was completed. Upon touchdown the aircraft again came under fire, but the “dustoff” remained on the ground until all of the inured plus the crew of the downed “dustoff” ship were on board. Only then did he take-off. After lift off the enemy again directed a heavy volume of fire at the aircraft. Using evasive maneuvers the enemy positions were avoided. Major Bowen’s courage under fire, excellent flying ability, and complete devotion to duty were directly responsible for the saving of six lives and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order 21, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 9 January 1970

BROWN, WILLIAM E.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
498th Medical Company (Air Ambulance)
Date of Action: 28 May 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942; and Message 16695, HQ USARV, 1 July 1966, The Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while engaged in aerial flight in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Specialist Five William E. Brown. Specialist Five Brown distinguished himself by heroic action on 28 May 1966 in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as the medical aidman on a medical evacuation helicopter assigned the mission of evacuating three seriously wounded American soldiers. The patient pickup site had been under heavy hostile fire when the evacuation request was received by Dustoff operations, but according to the ground elements, the site was temporarily secure when the air ambulance arrived. The medevac helicopter initiated an evasive high speed final approach and almost immediately came under heavy automatic weapons fire from the insurgent Viet Cong. When on the ground, Specialist Brown through hand and arm signals tried to get the ground troops to bring the wounded to the air ambulance, however, the hostile fire was so intense that the patients could not be moved safely. Specialist Brown unhesitatingly exposed himself to the insurgent fire without thought of risk to his own personal safety in order to attempt the evacuation of the wounded soldiers. After deciding the aircraft could not take many more hostile hits and remain flyable, the pilots executed an evasive departure from the area. Specialist Brown’s courage in the face of the enemy fire while in the landing zone was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 591, Headquarters, 1st Logistical Command, 22 June 1967

CROWLEY, CHRISTOPHER O.
Chief Warrant Officer, CW2, U.S. Army 159th Medical Detachment, 44th medical Brigade
Date of Action: 18 November 1969
Citation:

By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Regulation 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer CW2 Christopher O. Crowley, who distinguished himself while serving as an aircraft commander. When elements of the 25th Infantry came in contact with a large enemy force, several casualties were sustained. Chief Warrant Officer Crowley directed his pilot to the battle area. Upon arriving over the area, his helicopter came under intense enemy fire. As the pilot made a low level pass over the area, Chief Warrant Officer Crowley pinpointed the enemy positions and directed his door gunner’s fire on the enemy. While on the ground, Chief Warrant Officer Crowley aided in loading the wounded men aboard the helicopter. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Chief Warrant Officer Crowley’s bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 99, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 15 January 1970

HYLAND, WILLIAM L.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
68th Medical Detachment (HA)
Date of Action: 23 May 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Reg 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Specialist Five William L. Hyland, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for heroism in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Hyland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a medic aboard a dustoff helicopter. An aircraft was down in a dense jungle area and a heist was required. Helicopters which had been in the area prior to the dutoff’s arrival had drawn heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. The dustoff ship moved in and came to a hover over the crash wreckage. Specialist Hyland, without regard for his own personal safety, exposed himself as he hung out of the aircraft to operate the hoist. The crewchief on board the dustoff helicopter volunteered to go on down the hoist and aid the wounded soldier. As Specialist Hyland began to hoist the wounded soldier and the crewchief aboard the helicopter, the aircraft came under hostile fire. Despite this great danger, Specialist Hyland continued to expose himself to the enemy in order to operate the hoist and complete the mission. Once the patient was on board the aircraft Specialist Hyland applied the emergency medical treatment while enroute to a medical facility. Specialist Hyland’s heroism in the face of known enemy action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 26, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 7 January 1970

NEWELL, STEVEN C.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
236th Medical Detachment (HA)
Date of Action: 3 March 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Reg 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Specialist Four Steven C. Newell, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for heroism in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Steven C. Newell distinguished himself by heroic actions while serving as the medical aidman of an air ambulance on a rescue mission. Upon arriving over the scene of the action where another dustoff aircraft had just minutes earlier been shot down, they were advised that the ground element was in heavy contact with a large enemy force. Approaching the pickup site the aircraft came under intense enemy fire; however, the landing was completed. Upon touchdown the aircraft again came under fire, but the dustoff remained on the ground until all of the injured plus the crew of the downed dustoff ship were on board. Only then did they takeoff. After liftoff the enemy again directed a heavy volume of fire at the aircraft. After they were clear of the area he administered treatment to the wounded men. Specialist Newell’s courage under fire and complete devotion to duty were directly responsible for the saving of six lives and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 19, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 5 January 1970

PASK, JERRY B.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army 498th Medical Company, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 24 August 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Reg 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroism while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Specialist Four Jerry B. Pask, Army Medical Department, United States Army. Specialist Pask distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as medical aidman aboard a medical evacuation “Dustoff” helicopter. During the night and early morning a Korean ground unit sustained several casualties which were in need of immediate aeromedical evacuation. The ground unit was located in a rice paddy and was under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, since a complete landing to the ground could not be effected in the water and mud of the rice paddy, Specialist Pask climbed out onto the skids, exposing himself directly to the hostile fire, and guided the pilot through the darkness to the location of the casualties. Upon reaching the critically wounded, Specialist Pask, further, removed himself from the aircraft to load the patients aboard. Heedless of his personal danger, Specialist Pask went about his duties as medical aidman in the treatment of the patients on the three separate missions required to pick up eight casualties. His fearless determination under fire and strong devotion to duty, Specialist Pask successfully evacuated these eight casualties under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions which was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects greatly upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 100, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 15 January 1970

PICKETT, ROGER A.
Chief Warrant Officer 2, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
68th Medical Detachment (HA)
Date of Action: 23 May 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Reg 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer Two Roger A. Pickett, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for heroism in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam. Chief Warrant Officer Pickett was the aircraft commander of a dustoff helicopter that was called upon to evacuate the wounded from a helicopter that had been shot down by hostile fire. The ship had gone down in a dense jungle area and a hoist rescue was required. Other helicopters that had been in the area had drawn heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. After assessing the ground situation and his gunship support, CW2 Pickett decided to attempt the extraction. As CW2 Pickett skillfully maneuvered the aircraft to a tree top hover over the crash wreckage, the hoist was lowered. The injured on the ground was unable to get to the hoist and the crewchief volunteered to ride the hoist down and to aid the wounded soldier. As CW2 Pickett continued to hold the aircraft at a hover, the crewchief went down with the hoist, located the injured, and crawled with him back to the hoist. At this time the dustoff helicopter came under fire from hostile ground forces. Despite the great personal dangers involved, CW2 Pickett maintained the aircraft at a hover until the injured soldier and the crewchief were aboard the aircraft. Chief Warrant Offer Pickett’s skills as a pilot and heroism in the face of known enemy danger are in keeping with the highest military traditions and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 27, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 7 January 1970

ROSS, DAVID T.
Chief Warrant Officer WO1, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
68th Medical Detachment (HA)
Date of Action: 23 May 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Reg 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” device for heroic achievement while participating in aerial flight is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer WO1 David T. Ross, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for heroism in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Ross distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action while serving as pilot of a medical evacuation helicopter on a mission that was called upon to evacuate the wounded from a helicopter that had been shot down by hostile fire. The ship had gone down in a dense jungle area and a hoist rescue was required. Other helicopters that had been in the crash area had reported heavy small arms fire and automatic weapons fire. After coordination with the gunships, the dustoff crew went in for the pickup. After hovering over the crash site and lowering the hoist it was found that the injured on the ground were unable to move to the hoist. The dustoff crewchief volunteered to ride the hoist down and aid the wounded. As the crewchief brought the injured man to the hoist, the dustoff aircraft came under heavy fire from hostile ground forces. Despite the great personal dangers involved, the dustoff aircraft remained at a hover until the injured soldier and the crewchief were aboard the ship. Warrant Officer Ross’ heroism in the face of known danger are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 28, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 7 January 1970

WEST, JACK L.
Warrant Officer, WO1, U.S. Army 159th Medical Detachment, 44th medical Brigade
Date of Action: 18 November 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of Executive Order 9158, 11 May 1942, as amended by Executive Order 9242-A, 11 September 1942, AR 672-5-1, and USARV Regulation 672-1, the Air Medal with “V” Device for heroism while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Warrant Officer Jack L. West, who distinguished himself while serving as a pilot. When elements of the 25th Infantry came in contact with a large enemy force, several casualties were sustained. Warrant Officer West flew to the battle area to make the medical evacuation. Upon arriving over the area Warrant Officer West’s helicopter came under intense enemy fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Warrant Officer West exposed himself to the hail of fire as he landed in the contact area to make the evacuation. When the injured men had been loaded aboard the aircraft, Warrant Officer West flew the men to a nearby hospital. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives. Warrant Officer West’s bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 98, Headquarters, 44th Medical Brigade, 15 January 1970