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* Interesting Notes:

Staff Sergeant Charles K. Allen earned the Silver Star in Vietnam as well as the Bronze Star with “V” device an incredible four times in Vietnam.

Specialist Five Luis M. Aragon earned the Bronze Star with “V” device twice in addition to his ARCOM with “V” device.

Captain Ronald R. Blanck earned the ARCOM with “V” device in Vietnam. He would go on to become the Army Surgeon General from 1996 to 2000.

Amazingly, Specialist Five Gordon William Gaskin also earned the Distinguished Service Cross , Silver Star, and Bronze Star with “V” device.

Specialist Four James C. Kearney also earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with “V” device.

Specialist Four James B. O’Keefe earned the Silver Star in Vietnam as well as the Bronze Star with “V” device an incredible four times.

Specialist Five Raymond C. Mort also earned the Soldier’s Medal in Vietnam

* Denotes Posthumous Award

ALLEN, CHARLES K.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department
57th Ambulance Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 436th Medical Detachment, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 5 September 1964
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of AR 675-5-1 and DA Message 979888 dated 29 July 1964, the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Staff Sergeant Charles K. Allen. On 5 September 1964, Sergeant Allen distinguished himself with valor while serving as a medic on a helicopter ambulance near Vinh Khiem, Republic of Vietnam. The 5th Airborne Battalion of the Republic of Vietnam had suffered many casualties in a fierce battle with the Viet Cong that lasted well into the night. Running low on medical supplies and having many critically wounded personnel, the call for aid was sent out. Sergeant Allen’s helicopter ambulance, upon arriving at the scene, had to remain at a hover because the landing area was under 4 feet of water. Then Sergeant Allen, disregarding his own personal safety in the finest traditions of the United States Army Medical Corp, jumped from his aircraft and searched the water covered battlefield for casualties. The wounded were scattered throughout the area and it was necessary for him to wade through the waist deep water in search of them. Though often under sporadic sniper fire and in constant danger of a resumption of the mortar fire that had been received shortly before his helicopter had arrived, Sergeant Allen calmly and efficiently carried thirteen casualties to his aircraft. Several trips were required to evacuate all the wounded, but Sergeant Allen never faltered in his exhaustive lifesaving work. His tireless efforts and courageous actions were in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon Sergeant Allen, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 910, Headquarters, United States Army Support Command, Vietnam, 22 June 1965

ARAGON, LUIS M.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department
United States Army Headquarters & Support Company, 15th Medical Battalion
Date of Action: 3 January 1968 – 8 January 1968
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Specialist Five Luis M. Aragon. Specialist Five Aragon distinguished himself by heroism in action between the period 3 January to 8 January 1968, while serving as a medical aidman of a UH-1H helicopter during a combat mission in the Republic of Vietnam. During this period, Specialist Aragon was on over fifty medical evacuation missions. While performing these evacuations, he was frequently under intense enemy ground fire. Disregarding his own safety, Specialist Aragon located and neutralized many hostile position, and kept the pilots informed of obstacles in the landing zones. His display of personal bravery and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5898, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 24 June 1968

ATTENBERGER, BRUCE
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department
Company C, 1st Battalion, 46th Infantry, 23d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 23 November 1970
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Specialist Four Bruce Attenberger. Specialist Four Attenberger distinguished himself by valorous actions on 23 November 1970 while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company C, 1st Battalion, 46th Infantry. On that date, the company was conducting a search and clear operation in Tien Phuoc District when it was assaulted by a large North Vietnamese Army force. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist Attenberger unhesitatingly moved forward into the hostile fire zone to assist a fellow soldier wounded in the initial enemy fusillade. Ignoring the danger involved, he expertly administered emergency first aid to his comrade despite being exposed to the hostile barrage and carried him to a covered position. As a medical evacuation helicopter arrived on station, Specialist Attenberger again moved into the open area in order to guide the aircraft to the ground and carried his wounded comrade through the devastating enemy barrage to the ship. Through his timely actions, he contributed significantly to saving the life of his fellow soldier and served as an inspiration to his entire unit. Specialist Four Attenberger’s personal heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 23d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order’s number 1008, Headquarters, 23d Infantry Division, 22 January 1971

BLANCK, RONALD R.
Captain, Medical Corps, Army Medical Department
Headquarters, 5th Battalion, 22d Artillery, Headquarters, I Field Force Vietnam Artillery
Date of Action: 11 November 1968
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of paragraph, 33, Army Regulation 672-5-1, and USARV Reg. 672-1, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism is awarded to Captain Ronald R. Blanck, Medical Corps, Army Medical Department. Captain Ronald R. Blanck distinguished himself by exceptional heroism in the Republic of Vietnam on 11 November 1968, while serving as Battalion Surgeon with Headquarters, 5th Battalion, 22d Artillery. At approximately 1500 hours, while making rounds at the An Tuc Dispensary, a standoff attack was initiated. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Blanck immediately rendered assistance to his patient by aiding them to seek shelter beneath beds and mattresses. Suddenly ad round hit the dispensary causing several deaths and many injuries. Exposing himself to enemy fire, he provided immediate medical attention to the injured and assisted in moving the wounded persons to the 17th Evacuation Hospital. He then assisted in finding suitable shelter for the remaining Vietnamese. After everyone had been assisted, Captain Blanck finally sought shelter for himself. His timely reaction and bold courage prevented many additional casualties and reduced the effectiveness of the enemy attack. Captain Blanck’s professionalism, exceptional courage and intense devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 779, Headquarters, I Field Force Vietnam Artillery, 23 July 1969

GASKIN, GORDON WILLIAM
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department Headquarters and Headquarters Company
2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: Unknown
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of AR 675-5-1 and DA Message 979888 dated 29 July 1964, the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Specialist Five Gordon William Gaskin. Specialist Gaskin distinguished himself with valor while serving as a medic in the Republic of Vietnam. Disregarding his own personal safety, SP5 Gaskin calmly carried out his courageous actions to save the lives of his comrades while under heavy fire from the enemy. His actions were in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order unknown, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, as noted on his official DD FORM 214

KEARNEY, JAMES C.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Headquarters Service Company, 15th Medical Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division Airmobile
Date of Action: 6 February 1971
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army, under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, the following award is announced. The Army Commendation Medal with “V” device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile enemy force in the Republic of Vietnam is awarded to Specialist Four James C. Kearney. Specialist Kearney distinguished himself by valorous actions on 29 January 1971. Disregarding his own safety, he courageously exposed himself to the dangers inherent in the combat environment as he directed his efforts toward neutralizing the enemy threat. His valiant actions were characterized by a great concern for the welfare of his comrades and contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of the United States mission in the Republic of Vietnam. His loyalty, diligence, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 2444, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division Airmobile, 6 February 1971

MORT, RAYMOND C.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department
1st Logistical Command
Date of Action: 30 December 1966
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, and Message 16695, HQ USARV 1 July 1966, Subject: “Further Delegation of Award Authority”, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Specialist Five Raymond C. Mort, Army Medical Department. Specialist Five Raymond C. Mort distinguished himself by heroic actions while serving as medical aidman aboard a medical evacuation helicopter, when an urgent medical evacuation request was received from Ap Long Pho, an outpost under intense Viet Cong fire. With Specialist Mort at his door position, the Dustoff helicopter made a high performance low level approach from the west. As the helicopter flared to land, Specialist Mort informed the pilot that they were receiving fire and taking hits. The pilot immediately executed a sharp left turn to evade the hostile fire. On a second attempt, with Specialist Mort again at his position, the Dustoff made a high performance low level approach back into the outpost and landed as gunships laid down a ring of protective suppressive fire. Specialist Mort immediately exited the aircraft and exposed himself to the insurgent fire as he supervised and assisted loading the seriously wounded patients. When the wounded were safely on board, the Dustoff departed for medical facilities. Specialist Mort’s outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 700, Headquarters, 1st Logistical Command, 11 July 1967

O’KEEFE, JAMES B. (also spelled as O’KEEFFE)
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department
A Troop, 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 15 June 1969
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, and USARV Regulation 672-1, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to Specialist Four James B. O’Keefe, Army Medical Department. Specialist Four O’Keefe distinguished himself by heroic actions on 15 June 1969, while serving as a medic with A Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a sweep operation, elements of A Troop came in contact with a large enemy force. During the initial contact, several casualties were sustained. As he moved to the aid of his fallen comrades, Specialist O’[Keefe was also wounded. Ignoring his injuries, Specialist O’Keefe, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the hail of fire as he treated his injured comrades and helped to evacuate them to a safe area. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives. Specialist O’Keefe’s bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 9251, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, 16 July 1969

POTTER, GEORGE R.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps
Army Medical Department HHC, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 October 1967
Citation:
By direction of the Secretary of the Army under the provisions of Army Regulation 672-5-1, and USARV message 16695, 1 July 1966, The Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device for heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force is awarded to First Lieutenant George R. Potter, Medical Service Corps. First Lieutenant Potter distinguished himself by heroic actions on 28 October 1967, while serving as medical service officer with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry in the Republic of Vietnam. One platoon of Company D came in contact with an estimated Viet Cong company employing small arms, automatic weapons, sniper, and rifle grenade fire from heavily camouflaged bunkers and trenches. In the first few moments of the battle the platoon took numerous casualties from the intense enemy fire. Lieutenant Potter, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved into the bullet swept area to the trapped platoon’s position. He then moved forward to organize and assist in the evacuation of the wounded men from the Viet Cong kill zone. Although under intense hostile fire Lieutenant Potter personally carried one seriously wounded man to safety and then directed the final evacuation of the casualties to medical facilities. Due to Lieutenant Potter’s selfless actions and concern for his fellow soldiers, several lives were saved and the mission was brought to a successful conclusion. Lieutenant Potter’s personal bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 4648, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, 1 December 1967