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Soldier's Medal

* Interesting Notes

Read Lieutenant Colonel Richard F. Barquist’s citation of a daring rescue operation on a rugged snow covered mountain peak in Iran.

Captain James F. Blankenship was a Dental Corps Officer.

Captain Franklin J. Derusso saved the life of a suicidal patient preparing to jump from the 5th floor of the hospital.

Major Harold A. Endler’s quick thinking saved the life of a fellow Soldier and possibly his own during an airborne operation.

Major Floyd H. Kushner, Flight Surgeon, was a passenger on an aircraft that crashed in Vietnam. After freeing himself, he rescued the co-pilot and crew chief, before the craft exploded, in spite of his injuries and a bullet wound from exploding ammunition. While looking for a friendly unit, Major Kushner was captured and remained a POW for 5 years. Major Kushner also received the Silver Star for separate actions. He is believed to be the only doctor held as a POW in the Vietnam War.

First Lieutenant Diane M. Lindsay was the first African American Nurse Corps officer to earn the Soldier's Medal.

Specialist Five William S. Mikasa was aboard a CR-34 helicopter with 10 other passengers when it crashed and was totally demolished. Specialist Mikasa removed all of the victims, moved them a safe distance away, administered first aid, walked to arrange for evacuation and assisted in transporting the victims.

Second Lieutenant Norman G. Miller also earned the Bronze Star with "V" device in Korea

Master Sergeant Eugene L. Moon was seriously wounded while wrestling a pistol from an enraged soldier, thus saving the lives of others at the Enlisted Men’s Club.

Specialist Five Raymond C. Mort also earned the ARCOM with 'V' while in Vietnam

Sergeant First Class Mitchell Opas made 5 trips of approximately 75 yards carrying seriously wounded Chinese soldiers under heavy artillery fire.

Private First Class Perlmutter also earned the Silver Star and Bronze Star with "V" device during Vietnam

Private First Class Ronald A. Rout acted swiftly to save many lives after the crash of a C-124 aircraft in the icy Han River Estuary.

Captain Robert B. Sarajian climbed up to a platform attached to a telephone pole to save the life of a soldier who was electrocuted.

Specialist Four Malini Tia rescued two children who were trapped in a wrecked, burning, smoke-filled automobile.

Lieutenant Colonel Marian A. Tierney, an Army Nurse, earned her Soldier's Medal when the aircraft in which she was a passenger, crashed.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

ALLEN, EUGENE R.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 July 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Eugene R. Allen, Army Medical Service, United States Army United States Army Medical Center, Ryukyu Islands, who distinguished himself by heroism while assigned for duty as a Medical Aidman to the Okuma R&R Center, Ryukyu Islands. On 12 July 1967, Specialist Allen was summoned to render first aid to a fellow serviceman who had fallen from a waterfall approximately 100 feet high, located at Okuma, Okinawa. Showing complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Allen crawled over extremely hazardous terrain to where the victim lay seriously injured. Upon reaching the injured person, he administered emergency medical aid which stemmed loss of blood and prevented shock and the subsequent death of the patient. The physical characteristics of the terrain made evacuation by litter impossible and the hazardous areas along the evacuation route made it necessary for Specialist Allen to carry the patient on his back. During this slow, tedious procedure, Specialist Allen covered ground so hazardous that a single step could have resulted in death. Because of Specialist Allen’s alertness and quick thinking, the patient was evacuated to the United States Army Hospital, Ryukyu Islands, in record time for further medical treatment. Specialist Allen’s heroic performance of duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army Medical Corps. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Allen by the Commanding General, United States Army, Ryukyu Islands, under provisions of paragraph 7a, AR 672-5-1, for heroism on 12 July 1967.)
General Orders: General Order number 44, Department of the Army, 22 August 1968

ANDERSON, JAMES E.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 31 October 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel James E. Anderson, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 31 October 1966 at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Colonel Anderson while walking up a flight of stairs, observed a laboratory technician drop a glass bottle of highly toxic sulphuric acid, causing the contents to splash over his person and face. As the technician was groping around helplessly, being temporarily blinded by the acid, Colonel Anderson unhesitatingly rushed to his aid. With compete disregard for his own personal safety Colonel Anderson guided the technician to the nearest sink and commenced flushing the technician’s burns with water. Although Colonel Anderson himself had been splashed with sulphuric acid dangerously close to his eyes, he continued flushing the technician’s burns until help arrived. Only after the technician was in the care of other members of the Radiation Pathology Branch did Colonel Anderson tend to his own burns. Colonel Anderson’s presence of mind and prompt and heroic action in this sudden and hazardous situation undoubtedly prevented serious injury and reflects exemplary conduct in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

BAILIFF, FINLEY
Private, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 September 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private Finley Bailiff, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of Company “A”, 73d Tank Battalion, for heroism on 18 September 1955, near Taejon-ni, Korea. While off duty, Private Bailiff learned that three American servicemen lay injured in a mine field, and quickly proceeded to the scene of the accident to assist in rescue operations. During the hours of darkness, and fully aware of the danger involved, Private Bailiff unhesitatingly probed through dense brush and over-hanging vegetation and, with the help of a comrade, evacuated one of the ill-fated soldiers to safety. After administering emergency treatment to the suffering man, Private Bailiff headed an aid team and, entering the mined area a second and third time, rescued the other two casualties. Then he carefully surveyed the hazardous area for an alleged fourth victim, and repeated his search the following day to insure that no one was left in the mine field. Private Bailiff’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions reflect utmost credit on himself and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army

BAKER, JAMES C.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 January 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James C. Baker, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroic and meritorious action on the morning of 18 January 1968. Upon arriving at the flooded bridge crossing on Hardee Road, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Captain Baker, despite the swift water and without regard for his own personal safety, entered the water and swam from tree to tree in a vain attempt to locate the man and boy whom he had seen swept away by the rushing water. Captain Baker swam and waded in dangerous water approximately 1,000 yards in the unsuccessful search. Captain Baker’s courageous actions and disregard for personal safety in the face of danger were in the highest traditions of valor and reflect great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Service, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

BAKER, JOHNNY W.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 February 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Johnny W. Baker, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 7 February 1975, while a member of Air Ambulance Branch, United States Army Aeromedical Center. Specialist Five Baker’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 8 June 1976

BARQUIST, RICHARD F.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 – 6 February 1961
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Lieutenant Colonel (Medical Corps), [then Major] Richard F. Barquist, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy heroism during the period 4 to 6 February 1961, while assigned as Commanding Officer, United States Army Hospital, Teheran, Iran. An American L-23 aircraft, with two persons aboard, crashed on a rugged snow covered mountain peak in central Iran. When it was suggested that a doctor accompany the rescue search party, Colonel Barquist immediately and unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in the extremely dangerous rescue operation. It was believed the crash site at about the 13,000 foot level, which was characterized by heavy snow, violent winds, bitter cold, and imminent danger of avalanches, would be inaccessible during the winter months. The only possible access to the disaster scene from the point of operations at about 6,000 feet below the crash site was by helicopter which had to operate at reduced pay load and fuel load because of the high-altitude. Colonel Barquist flew in the first helicopter for the initial rescue attempt, and as it approached the area, a fierce storm suddenly arose and prevented the helicopter from landing. As the aircraft lashed by the strong wind bouncing around in the air and was in danger of crashing, he threw his meager survival equipment out the door and courageously jumped through the swirling and completely blinding snow from a height of about 20 feet. With grim determination, he fought his way through the bitter cold, deep snow and treacherous storm to reach the crash site. Although the victims had perished, through Colonel Barquist’s undaunted efforts, their remains were recovered for proper burial. He placed himself in this vulnerable position without regard for his own life or personal safety and clearly demonstrated his devotion to the health and safety of others. Colonel Barquist’s heroic act in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself the Medical Corps, and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 16, 10 April 1962

BETTENCOURT, WALTER V.
Chief Warrant Officer, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 21 March 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer Walter V. Bettencourt, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 21 March 1975, while a member of the 326th Medical Battalion, 101st Airborne Division. Chief Warrant Officer Bettencourt’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 22, Department of the Army, 26 November 1976

BINDA, RENO J.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 August 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Reno J. Binda, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by outstanding heroism involving voluntary risk of his life on 11 August 1968 at Lake Ontario, New York. During after duty hours Colonel Binda and a fellow officer were fishing in a 19 foot outboard motor boat on Lake Ontario when Colonel Binda heard faint sounds, believed to be calls for help. Upon looking over the surrounding waters he saw two floating objects in the distance approximately one mile away. The winds were high and th water was extremely rough. However, his companion operated the motor while Colonel Binda positioned himself in the bow of the boat to act as a guide through an area of rocks that was known for underwater shoals which created additional navigation hazards. Disregarding personal safety and at the risk of life, the boat was successfully maneuvered through the high waves and rocks to the spot where two men were found floating. Their boat had capsized and sunk in the water. With the assistance of his companion, Colonel Binda pulled one victim from the water into the boat. The other victim was floating face down in the water in a state of shock and near death from drowning. Colonel Binda had to dangle from the side of the boat while his companion held onto his feet in order to reach this victim and rescue him. Following first aid, this man was carried to a local marina whence he was rushed to a hospital. By his complete disregard for his own safety, and by his clear thinking, Colonel Binda was instrumental in saving the lives of two men. Colonel Binda’s prompt and courageous actions in this hazardous situation are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded by Commanding General, First United States Army, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, under the provisions of paragraph 7, AR 672-5-1, to Colonel Reno J. Binda for heroism on 11 August 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 20, Department of the Army, 7 April 1969

BLAND, JAMES G.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 July 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James G. Bland, Medical Corps, as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 13th Infantry, distinguished himself by heroism on 27 July 1964, near Michelstadt, Germany. When informed that urgent assistance was needed at the scene of an accident in which an Army truck, carrying sixteen tons of 155mm ammunition, had turned over, started to burn, and pinned the driver beneath the wreckage, Captain Bland unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in the rescue effort. As he and the rescue party arrived in a vehicle (Tracked Recovery) at the accident site in a wooded area, the exploding 155mm shells had started a number of brush fires and one serious fire threatened 40,000 acres of prime coniferous forest. With complete disregard for his own safety and ignoring the exploding shells and fire, he rode to the area of the wreckage where exploding shells prevented the evacuation of the truck driver. When the hazardous situation required that the rescue vehicle be moved to safe location, he dismounted and crawled through brush fires to reach the truck. Two minutes after the medics determined that the driver was no longer alive and the rescue party had moved to a safe are, a tremendous explosion occurred hurling blazing fragments into the air and starting new fires. Throughout the dangerous rescue mission, he demonstrated fortitude, perseverance, and deep concern for the life of a fellow soldier. Captain Bland’s heroic conduct is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 35, Department of the Army, 27 October 1965

BLANKENSHIP, JAMES F.
Captain, Dental Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 November 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James F. Blankenship, Dental Corps, United States Army for heroism on 6 November 1975, while a member of the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center. Captain Blankenship’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 22, Department of the Army, 26 November 1976

BUSWELL, ARTHUR W.
Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 December 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Colonel Arthur W. Buswell, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on the morning of 12 December 1968 at Hunter Liggett, California, while assigned as a member of G2/3 Section, Headquarters, United States Army Combat Developments Command Experimentation Command, Fort Ord, California. Colonel Buswell’s heroic effort that endangered his own life, was responsible for saving the life of the pilot of a U-1A Otter involved in a crash in which Colonel Buswell was a passenger. The plane became engulfed in flame after crashing. All passengers exited through the rear door. After a quick head count was taken, it was noted that the pilot was trapped in his cabin. The pilot was almost completely enveloped in flames when Colonel Buswell appeared at the pilot’s window. Colonel Buswell opened the door from the outside and helped the pilot from the aircraft. Had it not been for the courage of Colonel Buswell in returning to the burning aircraft, the pilot would have perished in the fire. It was apparent to everyone at the crash scene that the aircraft was about to explode when Colonel Buswell returned to release the pilot, and it did explode very shortly after they left the aircraft. Through Colonel Buswell’s quick presence of mind, ready courage and deep concern for the welfare of others, he risked a hazardous action and prevented a possible loss of life. Colonel Buswell’s heroic conduct and prompt action in this emergency situation are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 36, Department of the Army, 6 June 1969

CHAPPELL, LOYD D.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 26 July 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Loyd D. Chappell, United States Army, as a member of Headquarters Company, United States Army Hospital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina distinguished himself by heroism on 26 July 1965, near Columbia, South Carolina. Staff Sergeant Chappell was conducting personal business in a civilian agency when he heard a loud noise and then saw a flaming truck, loaded with lumber, skidding along the highway in an upturned position. He rushed to the scene of the accident and, with complete disregard for his own safety, forced his way into the blazing vehicle and assisted the helpless driver to a place of safety. After administering professional first aid to the driver, Staff Sergeant Chappell returned to the wrecked vehicle to make certain that there were no other occupants in it. Although he modestly departed from the scene without identifying himself, he was later identified in police reports as the person who participated in this courageous rescue effort. Staff Sergeant Chappell’s prompt and heroic action in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 23 February 1966

CRILLY, CLIFFORD L.
Specialist Six, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 10 November 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Six Clifford L. Crilly, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism while serving as the Field Medical Assistant of the United States Army Aviation Detachment (Antarctica Support), while participating in “Operation Deep Freeze 68” in Antarctica. On 10 November 1967 at Camp Number One, Marie Byrdland, Antarctica, Specialist Crilly was performing general duties about the camp when he observed an individual running through the camp with his clothing afire and being pursued by another soldier. The person in flames was obviously in a state of shock and pain. Recognizing the imminent danger to the person afire and the camp in general, he took chase after both individuals and overtook them. With sacrificial and total disregard for his personal safety he threw himself upon the flaming individual’s body and after some trying moments managed to extinguish the flames, thereby possibly saving a life and preventing the spread of flames through the entire camp. Specialist Crilly, by his demonstrated personal courage, has reflected distinct honor upon the United States Army, the United States Army Aviation detachment (Antarctica Support) and himself.
General Orders: General Order number 57, Department of the Army, 17 October 1968

CHRISTIE, ROBERT J.
Private First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 April 1960
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class Robert J. Christie, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the Hospital Detachment, United States Army Hospital, Fort Ord, California, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, on 8 April 1960. Private Christie and several companions were sitting on the Carmel Beach when shouts from others on the beach attracted his attention to a swimmer who was being dragged helplessly out to the open sea by the heavy surf. Disregarding the significance of a shark warning report which was announced earlier, and acting without hesitation or concern for his own personal safety, Private Christie plunged into the choppy water and swam out against the strong waves in an effort to aid the exhausted, floundering swimmer. Time after time, the swift current swept him back. Finally, after many grueling attempts, he reached the victim, helped him keep afloat, and assisted him back into shallow water where others on the beach pulled both of them ashore. Private Christi’s prompt, decisive action and courageous efforts saved the young soldier from certain death by drowning. The unselfish heroism which he displayed in this sudden emergency is worthy of emulation, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 42, Department of the Army, 7 November 1960

DONAHUE, EDWARD L.
Warrant Officer Junior Grade, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 March 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Warrant Officer Junior Grade Edward L. Donahue, United States Army, while a member of the Medical Detachment, 6941 Army Service Unit, Camp San Luis Obispo, California, distinguished himself by heroism at Baywood Park, California, on 1 November 1952. While he and friends were gathering abalones among the rocks jutting out from the beach into the ocean, a high wave came in unexpectedly, forcing them to seek a position of relative safety on top of the rocks to avoid being carried out to sea. He observed that one companion had been swept off the high rocks by the large swell and carried approximately 150 feet out into the treacherous waters. Realizing that his companion was unable to swim and in grave danger of drowning, without regard for his personal safety, Mr. Donahue unhesitatingly entered the turbulent surf and fought his way against great odds to effect the rescue of the distressed friend. Although his progress was greatly impeded by his heavy shoes and clothing, after determined effort he reached the victim and finally succeeded in bringing her to a place of safety on the beach. Mr. Donahue’s quick thinking and his prompt and courageous action reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 9 July 1954

DERUSSO, FRANKLIN J.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 June 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Franklin J. DeRusso, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by an act of unusual bravery and heroism without regard to his own safety on the 19th of June 1968, at the United States Army Medical Center, United States Army Hospital, Ryukyu Islands. On that date, a suicidal patient was preparing to jump from the 5th floor of the hospital, when Captain DeRusso appeared and began to talk to him. This had no effect on the patient and Captain DeRusso crawled beneath the protective fence to the roof ledge which was only 3 ½ feet wide and quite slippery. He walked to the patient and stepped directly between him and the edge of the ledge. Captain DeRusso talked to the patient in a calm tone of voice, and moments later, led the patient back along the length of the protective fence, being careful to keep the patient between himself and the fence, thereby preventing any sudden attempt for the patient to jump off the ledge. The patient, being a much larger man than Captain DeRusso, placed Captain DeRusso at a distinct disadvantage. Captain DeRusso placed his life in jeopardy as the ledge was narrow and slippery and he would surely have been carried over the edge if the patient had made any attempt at harming himself. The patient involved in this incident was a psychiatric patient with a history of several years of bizarre and unusual behavior. He was known to have been potentially violent. There was strong evidence of organic brain damage, making him an unpredictable and unstable person even under normal circumstances. This patient was quite apt to make a sudden and unpredictable lunge and thus carry Captain DeRusso with him over the edge of the ledge to certain death five stories below. Captain DeRusso’s courageous actions were with complete disregard for his own safety and demonstrated a rare sense of obligation to his fellow man. Captain DeRusso’s actions were in accordance with the finest traditions of the United States Army and the Medical Corps.
General Orders: General Order number 7, Department of the Army, 29 January 1969

DUNCALFE, JOSEPH R.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 1 September 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Joseph R. Duncalfe, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 385th Evacuation Hospital (Semimobile), Spokane, Washington, distinguished himself by heroism on 1 September 1964, near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Sergeant Duncalfe was driving on a state highway when he witnessed an accident in which an automobile spun out of control, plunged into Lake Coeur d’Alene, and sunk into water ten feed in depth. Upon stopping his car, he observed that the occupants of the disabled vehicle had not surfaced and were in danger of drowning. Despite the rain, cold, and wind, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Duncalfe unhesitatingly dove into the turbulent waters of the lake and succeeded in removing the trapped and seriously injured elderly couple from the sunken car. After getting the man and woman to the safety of the shore, he efficiently administered first aid to them and comforted the elderly couple until an ambulance arrived. Sergeant Duncalfe’s heroic actions and deep concern for his fellow man are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself, the United States Army Reserve, and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Staff Sergeant Duncalfe for heroism on 1 September 1964, as announced in General Orders Number 1, Headquarters, United States Continental Army Command, Fort Monroe, Virginia, dated 5 January 1965)
General Orders: General Order number 19, Department of the Army, 28 May 1965

ENDLER, HAROLD A.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 June 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Major Harold A. Endler, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, while a member of the XVIII Airborne Corps, distinguished himself by heroism during a mass tactical exercise on 27 June 1956, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. When another jumper, whose parachute did not open, became enmeshed in Major Endler’s suspension lines, Major Endler took immediate command of the situation. Realizing that if the man deployed his reserve parachute within such close proximity it would possibly cause his own parachute to collapse, Major Endler instructed the jumper to grasp his suspension lines and the two descended safely to the ground on Major Endler’s parachute. The prompt and decisive action taken by Major Endler, with the full knowledge that the additional weight on his parachute was a risk to his own life, prevented a fatal jump. Major Endler’s heroic conduct and unselfish action were undoubtedly instrumental in saving a fellow paratrooper from serious injury or death thereby reflecting the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 15, Department of the Army, 2 May 1958

FISHER, CLARENCE J.
Master Sergeant, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 July 1953
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Master Sergeant Clarence J. Fisher, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism not involving actual conflict with the enemy on 28 July 1953 in the vicinity of Ansan, North Korea. At approximately 1555 hours on that date, an ammunition dump exploded, inflicting many casualties. Sergeant Fisher, working in an Aid Station not far from the dump immediately rushed to the area. Quickly appraising the situation and realizing the dire need for medical attention, he began administering first aid to the seriously wounded men. Although completely exposed to the still burning and exploding shells, he worked unceasingly for two hours giving aid and preparing for the evacuation of the critically wounded. By his prompt and courageous actions in this emergency, Sergeant Fisher quickened the evacuation of the wounded and injured, thus keeping the death rate at a minimum. The inspirational conduct and heroic actions displayed by Sergeant Fisher reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 315, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 14 August 1953
Home of Record: New Jersey

FITZSIMMONS, JAMES T.
Private First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 April 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class James T. Fitzsimmons, United States Army, as a member of the 28th General Hospital, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, Distinguished himself by hero ism on 2 April 1965, in the vicinity of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Private Fitzsimmons was one of five persons in a car when it skidded on an icy road as it approached a bridge, went over an embankment, and landed upside down in approximately 5 feet of water. After freeing himself from the wreckage, he worked diligently to extricate three of the passengers who were trapped in the rear seat of the crushed vehicle. With complete disregard for his own safety, he went under the water three times and each time succeeded in rescuing a victim. Moments before the driver reached safety unaided, Private Fitzsimmons had plunged into the icy water for the fourth time to rescue the driver. Private Fitzsimmons’ heroic conduct, perseverance, and profound concern for his fellow man during this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 40, Department of the Army, 9 December 1965

FLOCK, JOHN D.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 16 January 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam: On this date, Lieutenant Flock was serving as medical operations officer at his battalion’s aid station in Lai Khe Base Camp. A helicopter flying over the friendly encampment suddenly developed mechanical difficulties and crashed approximately 100 meters from his location. Lieutenant Flock immediately moved to the scene of the accident and observed six seriously injured men. Although fuel from the ruptured gas tanks was creating an extreme danger of fire or explosion, he completely disregarded his personal safety and began to free three individuals trapped inside the wreckage. After the casualties were removed, Lieutenant Flock instantly administered medial aid and ensured the men were rapidly evacuated. His courageous initiative and outstanding professionalism were responsible for saving the lives of at least two of these individuals. First Lieutenant Flock’s heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1748, Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, 10 March 1969

HANCOCK, JAMES F.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 December 1963
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four James F. Hancock, Medical Department, United States Army, as a member of the 595th Medical Company, distinguished himself by heroism at Smiley Barracks, Karlsruhe, Germany, on 7 December 1963. Specialist Hancock was performing maintenance duties when a fellow soldier attempted to start a flooded generator which backfired, ignited the gasoline, and set the man’s clothing on fire. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Hancock unhesitatingly rushed to the aid of the soldier and extinguished the flames from the clothing by throwing him to the ground and smothering the blaze with his own body. Specialist Hancock’s heroic conduct, sound judgment, and prompt actions in this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 5 February 1965

HASKELL, RICHARD D.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 May 1963
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Richard D. Haskell, (then First Lieutenant), Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism at the United States Army Tripler General Hospital, In Hawaii, on 6 May 1963. When Captain Haskell learned that a female patient was observed sitting on the edge of a narrow ledge abutting a patio on the ninth floor of the hospital, her rushed to the scene to render assistance. He quickly addressed the hazardous situation and determined that the depressed, hysterical patient intended to leap to the ground, over one hundred feet below. With ingenuity and speed, he requested the trouser belts of the men in the vicinity, assembled them into a safety belt, and attached it to the rear of his own belt. Then, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, and only the protection of the makeshift safety belt, he unhesitatingly jumped onto the ledge and returned the despondent patient to safety. Captain Haskell’s heroic action in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 49, Department of the Army, 22 November 1963

HAUBRICH, HAROLD V.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 March 1962
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Harold V. Haubrich, United States Army, while serving as a Senior Aidman, Company B, 1st Battle Group, 23d Infantry, Fort Richardson, Alaska, distinguished himself by heroism on 27 March 1962 in the vicinity of Campbell Pass, Alaska. Specialist Haubrich was on a routine cross country field training exercise over rugged and hazardous terrain covered with several feet of snow when the lead sergeant of the trail breaking party was suddenly caught in a snow avalanche which carried him down the side of a mountain and buried him under heavy snow. Without hesitation or regard for his own life, and despite the warnings of another member of the party, Specialist Haubrich, laden with skis, rucksack, and field gear, swiftly jumped into the snow slide to assist the trapped sergeant. This rapid action enabled him to retain sight of the sergeant, who, with the exception of one hand, was buried completely under the snow and unable to move either of his arms when the slide subsided. He then quickly and persistently dug a 2 ½ foot passage to the victim’s face and cleared the snow to prevent suffocation. After much difficulty in digging the sergeant out of the snow, he rendered first aid treatment and accompanied him until he was out of danger. Specialist Haubrich’s initiative, perseverance, and courageous and prompt action in the dangerous feat reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 14 January 1963

HEINE, JOHN F.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 30 August 1952
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class John F. Heine, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 30 August 1952 in the vicinity of Kumgong-ni, North Korea. On that date, a platoon from the Replacement Training Center suffered heavy casualties from an exploding mine when they unknowingly entered an unmarked mine field. Shortly after Sergeant Heine arrived at the scene with a rescue party, another mine was detonated, killing several persons nearby and wounding others. With complete disregard for personal safety, Sergeant Heine unhesitatingly rushed into the mine field and began giving emergency medical treatment to the seriously injured. Although the danger of additional mines exploding was great, he remained carrying on with his merciful duties of treating the wounded and supervising litter teams. His immediate aid undoubtedly resulted in the saving of many lives which otherwise would have been lost. Sergeant Heine’s disregard for his safety, devotion to duty, and courage reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 131, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 20 April 1953
Home of Record: Illinois

HOHE, KENNETH W.
Specialist Fourth Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 June 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Kenneth W. Hohe, United States Army, a member of Medical Detachment, United States Army Hospital, Asmara, Eritrea, Ethiopia, distinguished himself by heroism on 15 June 1959. Specialist Hohe was a passenger in a jeep carrying United States Mail and following another vehicle over a rugged and winding mountainous road from Massawa to Asmara, Eritrea. As the vehicle rounded a curve, five road bandits armed with rifles stopped it, forced the passengers to dismount and searched and relieved them of personal items. The jeep rounded the bend shortly thereafter and, spotting the bandits and quickly realizing the precarious position, the members of the second party stopped approximately 75 feet from the lead vehicle. When the bandits approached the jeep, the driver raised and fired his pistol, hitting the nearest bandit in the abdomen and knocking him to the ground. Without hesitation or concern for his own personal safety, Specialist Hohe drew his pistol and began firing at the remaining bandits who, after attempting to return the fire, fled over the retaining wall by the roadside. Specialist Hohe’s prompt response and presence of mind aided in repelling the bandits, prevented the loss of United States Government property and Mail and saved the party from the vicious action of bandits known in this area by their ruthless activity. His courageous efforts in this dangerous situation are worthy of emulation, and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 43, Department of the Army, 4 December 1959

KUSHNER, FLOYD H.
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 28 – 30 November 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Major (then Captain) Floyd H. Kushner, Medical Corps. Major Kushner distinguished himself by acts of exceptional valor on 28 November 1967. At the time, Major Kushner was the Flight Surgeon for the 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. While on a combat support mission, the aircraft in which Major Kushner was a passenger crashed on a remote mountain top. Although severely injured, Major Kushner succeeded in freeing himself from the wreckage, and, at great personal risk and with great difficulty, pulled the critically injured copilot and crew chief to safety before the aircraft exploded and burned. In spite of his injuries and a bullet wound sustained when the aircraft ammunition exploded, Major Kushner remained at the crash site and administered aid, comfort, and medical attention to his fellow crewmen. When it became evident on 30 November that the copilot, CW2 Bedworth, was dying from internal injuries, Major Kushner, at WO Bedworth’s insistence, left the crash site in an attempt to find a friendly unit and lead them to WO Bedworth’s aid. Shortly thereafter, he was captured, and remained a POW in South and North Vietnam for the next five years. Major Kushner’s heroic actions, dedication, and selfless sacrifices are in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: DA Form 638, Certificate by COL Robert H. Nevins, Jr., COL, ACofS G3/DPT, III Corps and Fort Hood, 29 May 1974

LABEUR, LEONARD
Master Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 March 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Master Sergeant Leonard LaBeur, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of the 6516th Army Service Unit, University of Washington ROTC Instructor Detachment, distinguished himself by heroism at Ketchikan, Alaska, on 19 March 1951. A fellow soldier had stumbled in the darkness and fallen over the edge of the Coast Guard dock into the water, striking his head against the side of the United States Coast Guard cutter Citrus as he fell. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant LaBeur, without hesitation, jumped from the dock, approximately 20 feet down into the icy and debris-cluttered water, found his comrade in the darkness, and held the head of the unconscious soldier above the water until both were pulled up to safety by members of the crew of the Citrus. The prompt and courageous action taken by Sergeant LaBeur in the face of grave danger saved the life of his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 85, Department of the Army, 25 September 1951

LEE, HAROLD R.
Recruit, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 9 July 1960
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Recruit Harold R. Lee, United States Army, a member of Company C, Third Battalion, United States Army Medical Training Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, distinguished himself by heroism on 9 July 1960. While driving from his home to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Recruit Lee noticed a gasoline fire in the rear of a truck driven by a civilian approximately 1 mile from West, Texas. He quickly notified the driver who, realizing that he lacked proper firefighting equipment, backed the truck into a nearby body of water. There was an immediate drop-off of approximately 15 feet, and the truck plunged instantly to the bottom of the deep water. Promptly determining that the driver of the burning truck was unable to extricate himself, Recruit Lee, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, dived into the deep water and rescued the trapped man through the window of the truck. The unselfish courage, prompt actions and presence of mind displayed by Recruit Lee in saving the life of a fellow man in this sudden emergency are worthy of emulation, and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 35, Department of the Army, 7 September 1960

LEHOUX, GERARD J.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 August 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Gerard J. Lehoux, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 11 August 1968 as he voluntarily risked his life in order to save the lives of two human beings. While fishing after duty hours at Lake Ontario, New York, Captain Lehoux resued two male civilians who were drowning. This act was performed voluntarily and at the risk of his own life due to the rough, rock filled waters through which he navigated in order to perform the rescue. Captain Lehoux’s act of valor bears signal credit upon him, the United States Army and the military establishment.
General Orders: General Order number 85, Department of the Army, 15 December 1969

LINDSAY, DIANE M.
First Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 1 July 1970
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant Diane M. Lindsay, Army Nurse Corps, United States Army, who distinguished herself by heroism on 1 July 1970 as she risked her life in order to save the lives of others. While on duty with the 95th Evacuation Hospital in Da Nang, Lieutenant Lindsay happened on a berserk soldier who had pulled the pin on a grenade, and after throwing it, was preparing to do the same with a second grenade. Lieutenant Lindsay and a male officer physically restrained the confused soldier and persuaded him to give up the second grenade, and thus prevented numerous casualties.
General Orders: General Order unknown, from News Release, Office of The Surgeon General, Technical Liaison Team, 1 July 1970

LITTLE, RICHARD E.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Richard E. Little, (then Private First Class), United States Army, who, while serving as a Medical Aidman for the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor, 4th Armored Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 8 May 1967 during a field training exercise at Hohenfels, Germany. Two unidentified men from the 3d Infantry Division rushed into the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor mess hall and reported they had heard screams from the impact area of the M79 Grenade Launcher Range. Specialist Little, a battalion aidman, who was present in the mess hall, immediately went to the motor pool and procured an armored ambulance, and accompanied by two other Medical Aidmen, rushed to the scene of the accident. Using the armored ambulance to protect themselves as much as possible from further explosions, the three aidmen maneuvered across the two hundred meters of dud-infested impact area to the aid of the injured men. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Little dismounted the ambulance and proceeded on foot across the dud-strewn impact area to the first injured man. Specialist Little and the other aidmen reached the wounded man and carried him across the dud-strewn area to the ambulance. Then, unhesitatingly, Specialist Little crossed the area for a second time to the other injured man who was over fifty feet from the ambulance. When the second man had been loaded into the ambulance, the vehicle was carefully driven out of the impact area to an awaiting helicopter. Although the range was not in use at the time the two men were injured, the danger of personal injury due to grenade explosions was very real. Specialist Little’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Little per General Order Number 125, Headquarters, Fourth Armored Division, APO New York 09326, dated 1 April 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 50, Department of the Army, 26 September 1968

LOWRY, ISAAC D.
Private, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 September 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private Isaac D. Lowry, Army Medical Service, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 15 September 1967 while in training with Company B, Third Battalion, United States Army Medical Training Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Upon hearing an emergency police call on a ham radio receiver that two young girls were trapped an in danger of drowning in the flood waters at Nolan Street underpass, San Antonio, Texas; Private Lowry ran to the scene where a crowd of approximately fifty people were standing observing the two girls floundering in the swirling waters. Seeing that the girls were either unable to or afraid to attempt to reach safety and in immediate danger of being swept away by the still rising flood waters, Private Lowry, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, jumped into the raging waters and, with almost superhuman effort, fought his way through the strong treacherous currents to where the two girls were trapped and wrapped his legs around a bridge center pole nearby. While holding himself in this position, Private Lowry held the two girls in his arms until firemen and police arrived at the scene with rescue equipment and pulled them out. Although exhausted from his fight against the strong currents while holding the two girls, Private Lowry assisted the rescue team in rescuing the two girls from the waters before considering help for himself. This spontaneous reaction to an emergency situation and completely unselfish act by Private Lowry in the face of extreme danger to his own life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal with “V” device for heroism on 15 September 1967, under provisions of paragraph 7, AR 672-5-1.)
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

LUEKENS, CLAUDE A. JR.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 25 May 1958
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Captain Claude A. Luekens, Jr., Medical Corps, United States Army, while Commanding Officer, 12th Medical Dispensary General, United States Forces, distinguished himself by heroism on 25 May 1958. While on the bank of the Loisach River near Garmisch, Germany, Captain Luekens observed a German national being swept downstream in the extremely swift waters of a very dangerous stretch of rapids containing many huge boulders. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he ran down a distance of approximately 300 yards along the bank of the river in an effort to overtake the victim. He entered the treacherous water to a depth of 3 ½ feet and managed to drag the downing man, 20 pounds heavier than himself, onto the bank where he immediately administered artificial respiration to the unconscious man who had stopped breathing. As a result of Captain Luckens’ prompt action, the victim was revived and taken to a hospital where he completely recovered. Captain Luekens’ presence of mind and courageous and unselfish action in risking his life in this extremely hazardous situation saved a fellow man from drowning, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 36, Department of the Army, 12 November 1958

MARTIN, ROBERT E.
Specialist Second Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 5 June 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Specialist Second Class Robert E. Martin, (then Specialist Third Class), Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 503d Airborne Infantry, distinguished himself by heroism at Rock Drop Zone, Munich, Germany, on 5 June 1956. While participating in a routine training jump from an aircraft in flight a soldier who exited the aircraft shortly after Specialist Martin fell through the suspension lines of Specialist Martin’s parachute. Specialist Martin, displaying quick thinking, grabbed the lines of his fellow soldier’s parachute. This action slowed his fall enough so that Specialist Martin could grasp the canopy of the deflated parachute. During the descent, the extra weight on Specialist Martin’s parachute caused many of the suspension lines to snap. Despite the grave danger to himself Specialist Martin held the canopy of the deflated parachute until the two paratroopers reached the ground. Specialist Martin’s prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and is keeping with the traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 23, Department of the Army, 29 April 1957

MCCOWAN, RALPH L.
Sergeant, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 16 August 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded Sergeant Ralph L. McCowan, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2s Infantry Division, distinguished himself through heroism on 16 August 1951 in the vicinity of Wanggu, Korea. On this date friendly tanks were firing on a distant enemy bunker and Companies G and H’s heavy weapons platoons were providing supporting fire for the tanks. Sergeant McCowan, assigned to a machine gun section, was assisting in building a bunker position near the tanks when one of them exploded. Without a moment’s hesitation, he advanced to the flaming tank and with complete indifference to the furnace-like heat and the impending danger of the tank exploding again, he began to remove the injured men from the wreckage. In the process of rescuing the trapped men, Sergeant McCowan himself was burned, but still he continued to assist the crewmen from the tank. After evacuating each man to a safe position he administered medical aid and as a result of his quick action the seriousness of the injuries were held to a minimum. Sergeant McCowan’s heroism in a time of emergency reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 816, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 5 December 1951
Home of Record: Michigan

MIKASA, WILLIAM S.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 November 1963
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five William S. Mikasa, United States Army, while serving as an Aidman, Troop D, 3d Squadron, 12th Cavalry, 3d Armored Division (Spearhead), distinguished himself by heroism on 6 November 1963, near Hirzenhein, Germany. Specialist Mikasa was aboard a CR-34 helicopter with ten other passengers when the aircraft crashed in a hilly, heavily wooded area, was totally demolished, and subject to explosion from an arcing high power line which fell across the front fuel cell. Ignoring the impending danger, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Mikasa worked diligently and succeeded in removing all of the victims from the wreckage and then carried them a safe distance away. After administering first aid to the injured, he hastily walked nearly a mile and, upon reaching a German sanatorium, arranged for the evacuation of the wounded. For the next 2 or 3 hours, he assisted in transporting, on foot, three very seriously injured soldiers by stretcher to the sanatorium, and then again returned to the wreckage to offer further assistance. By his fortitude, perseverance, and courageous actions throughout this hazardous emergency situation, he saved the lives of many of the aircraft passengers. Specialist Mikasa’s heroic conduct and deep concern for this fellow soldiers are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal awarded for heroism, on 6 November 1963, as announced in General Orders Number 74, Headquarters, 3d Armored Division (Spearhead), APO 39, US Forces, dated 28 April 1964)
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 5 February 1965

MILLER, JOHN R.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 72d Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 1 January 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy is awarded to Sergeant John R. Miller, Army Medical Service, Army of the United States, distinguished himself by heroic action near Yongdong-Po, Korea on 1 January 1951. On that date Sergeant Miller was attached to a tank company being transported by rail to the Seoul area. While the train was stopped on a rail siding, a soldier was struck by a train traveling on the next track. The injured soldier, attempted to crawl under the wheels of the moving train. Sergeant Miller rushed to his side and struggled to pull the man to safety. During the struggle Sergeant Miller was also struck by the train, but succeeded in holding the man free till the train had passed. Realizing the dangers of struggling with a delirious man who might have thrown him beneath the train’s wheels, Sergeant Miller risked his life in a successful attempt to save another man’[s life. The courage displayed on this occasion by Sergeant Miller reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 392, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 3 August 1951
Home of Record: Tennessee

MILLER, NORMAN G.
Second Lieutenant, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 14 August 1953
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Second Lieutenant Norman G. Miller, Medical Corps, a member of the 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Kumwha, Korea on 14 August 1953. Lieutenant Miller, upon hearing that an ammunition dump had exploded, immediately went to the area. Learning that several men were hut by the explosion and were still in the danger zone, Lieutenant Miller, disregarding his personal safety, entered the burning and exploding area to assist in carrying the wounded men to safety. Lieutenant Miller's act was strictly voluntary and upon his own initiative, although he knew his life would be endangered during every moment he was in the danger area. Lieutenant Miller's heroic actions greatly aided in saving the lives of the men and won for him the admiration and respect of superiors and subordinates alike. The sincere devotion to duty, great bravery and initiative displayed by Lieutenant Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 464, Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division, 1 October 1953
Home of Record: California

*MITCHEL, EARNEST L.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 3 July 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded posthumously to Sergeant First Class Earnest L. Mitchel, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 3 July 1975, while a member of the Headquarters and Support Company, 7th Medical Battalion. Sergeant First Class Mitchel’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation at the cost of his life are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 8 June 1976

MODJESKA, GERALD S.
First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 July 1953
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant Gerald S. Modjeska, Medical Corps, United States Army, Medical Company, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by heroism not involving actual conflict with the enemy on 28 July 1953 in the vicinity of Ansan, North Korea. On that date, Lieutenant Modjeska was serving in the Battalion Aid Station when a tremendous explosion occurred in a nearby ammunition dump, inflicting heavy casualties. He immediately rushed to the scene of action and upon arrival, began to render prompt medical attention to the injured men. Although the area in which he worked was being constantly showered by shrapnel from exploding mortar rounds, grenades and small arms ammunition, he worked unceasingly to care for the wounded. Despite near exhaustion, he administered first aid until all the wounded had been treated and evacuated. Lieutenant Modjeska’s heroic actions were instrumental in saving the lives of many men and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 315, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 14 August 1953
Home of Record: Indiana

MOGLIA, GEORGE E.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 July 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant George E. Moglia, (then Second Lieutenant), Medical Service Corps, United States Army, a member of the 53d Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), distinguished himself by heroism near Verdun, France on 23 July 1955. Lieutenant Moglia, attached to Headquarters Advance Section, USAREUR Communications Zone, on temporary duty, was preparing his H-13 helicopter for flight when he was notified of an aircraft accident. He immediately proceeded to the scene of the mishap by air. Upon arrival, Lieutenant Moglia noticed that the aircraft was submerged in a small lake with only the tail surfaces visible. Realizing that the pilot might be trapped in the cockpit, Lieutenant Moglia, with complete disregard to personal safety, entered the fuel covered water and attempted to extricate the pilot. After braving the fuel-filled water and spending long minutes under the surface, Lieutenant Moglia became ill. Despite being ill from swallowing the water and getting it in his eyes, he continued his efforts and with the assistance of a fellow officer, he succeeded in removing the pilot from the wreckage and transported him to shore and into the ambulance. Lieutenant Moglia’s heroic attempt to save the life of a brother officer at a decided risk to his own reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 6, Department of the Army, 4 February 1957

MOON, EUGENE L.
Master Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 August 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Master Sergeant Eugene L. Moon, Medical Department, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while a member of Detachment I (Provisional), 8202d Army Unit, Headquarters, United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, in Korea, on 6 August 1955. While Sergeant Moon was dining at the Enlisted Men’s Club, a member of his detachment, who had been reprimanded and evicted from the club a short time before for violating club rules returned to the club armed with a revolver. Brandishing his weapon, the belligerent soldier commanded everyone to remain seated. One man who stood up was promptly fired upon and slightly wounded. Sergeant Moon, realizing that others might be seriously wounded or killed, ordered the soldier to surrender his weapon. When he refused to obey, Sergeant Moon, with complete disregard for his own safety, leaped to his feet and attempted to wrest the pistol from him. During the ensuing struggle, Sergeant Moon was fired upon at close range and seriously wounded. Sergeant Moon’s heroic action undoubtedly saved others in the group from serious injury and possible death, reflecting great credit on himself and upholding the esteemed traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 21 March 1956

MORT, RAYMOND C. ARCOM with “V” Device Vietnam
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
82nd Medical Detachment (HA)
Date of Action: 26 September 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Raymond C. Mort, Army Medical Department, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroic actions on 26 September 1966, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Specialist Mort was serving as medical aidman aboard an aero-medical evacuation helicopter in support of the 9th ARVN Division in the vicinity of Tra Vinh, Republic of Vietnam. An American helicopter had crashed into the South China Sea near the beach and a Dustoff 81 approached the crash scene, a lone survivor was observed clinging to the aircraft mast sticking out of the choppy water. Specialist Mort realizing the danger involved by the three foot waves and the fact that the Dustoff aircraft might come under enemy fire from the tree line approximately 200 meters away and be forced to pull off, unhesitatingly dove into the water, swam to the dazed and bleeding survivor and secured a life preserver to him. Specialist Mort then submerged himself to search for survivors inside the aircraft but was overcome by the strong undertow current and swept away. After several anxious moments on the part of the rest of the crew, he was able to fight his way back to the surface of the water, emerging approximately 10 to 15 meters from the wrecked helicopter. The survivor then released his hold on the wreckage and was swept by the current toward the waiting Dustoff aircraft. Only after the survivor was loaded safely aboard, did Specialist Mort inflate his own life preserver and swim to the waiting aircraft. Specialist Mort then assisted in emergency medical treatment of the survivor enroute to Saigon facilities. Demonstrating courage, determination and devotion to duty of the highest order, Specialist Mort unhesitatingly placed the life of his fellow man above his own. Specialist Mort’s brave actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 73, Headquarters, 1st Logistical Command, 29 January 1967

MURRAY, RICHARD E.
Specialist Six, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 June 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Six Richard E. Murray, United States Army, as a member of the 254th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), United States Army Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado, distinguished himself by heroism on 18 June 1965 while participating in flood relief efforts in the vicinity of Last Chance, Colorado. Specialist Murray was aboard a helicopter ambulance helping to evacuate people from the disaster area when a call was received requesting the rescue of a man stranded on top of a truck in the midst of raging flood waters. Despite the strong gusty winds, the pilot succeeded in hovering the helicopter over the truck and a rope was extended to the man. After the rope was secured and the helicopter moved up and away, the rope failed and the man dropped into the water. Without hesitation, Specialist Murray jumped from the helicopter into the water and held the unconscious man above the water. He then grabbed the rope and, while holding the victim, was towed by helicopter to a shoreline. Although he sustained sever bruises and flesh cuts while being dragged through the water, he ignored his own discomforts and immediately administered artificial respiration to the victim. He continued his efforts until the helicopter ambulance landed and the man was placed on board. Specialist Murray’s heroic conduct, prompt actions, and complete disregard for his own safety in this emergency situation are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Murray for heroism on 18 June 1965 as announced in General Orders Number 227, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized) and Fort Carson, dated 22 July 1965)
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 23 February 1966

OPAS, MITCHELL
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 August 1958
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Mitchell Opas, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as Medical Advisor to the Kinmen Defense Command, Army of the Government of the Republic of China on 23 August 1958. When the off-shore Kinmen Complex was subjected to an intense artillery attack from the Communist held Chinese mainland, it sustained over 55,000 rounds of artillery fire. Despite the ever present danger of losing his life, Sergeant Opas constantly exposed himself to this heavy artillery fire to rescue seriously wounded Chinese soldiers. Without concern for his own personal safety, Sergeant Opas bodily carried a Chinese officer approximately 75 yards under extremely hazardous and threatening conditions to an underground shelter. Returning to the same area under the same perilous circumstances, he made repeated trips and carried four additional Chinese soldiers seriously wounded by enemy shell fire to safety. Sergeant Opas immediately rendered effective first aid to these wounded men and personally evacuated them to a field hospital. The unselfish courage, devotion to duty and heroic actions displayed by Sergeant Opas elicited the high praise of the President of the Republic of China, the Chinese Army Commander of the Kinmen Defense Command, and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 13 March 1959

PERLMUTTER, JAMES
Private First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 21 December 1967
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class James Perlmutter, United States Army for heroism on 21 December 1967 while a member of Company A, 1st Medical Battalion, 1st Infantry Division. On this date, at approximately 1600 hours, a fire started in the ammunition supply point at the Lai Khe Base Camp. A series of massive explosions ensued, causing numerous casualties and creating mass disorder in the entire area. Upon hearing of the disaster, Private First Class Perlmutter and several others boarded a nearby armored personnel carrier and made their way to the ammunition supply point. Ignoring the danger of constantly exploding rounds, the group moved into the center of the area. Private First Class Perlmutter, spotting two casualties, jumped from the vehicle and, without regard for his own personal safety, assisted in moving the two wounded men out of the area to a waiting ambulance. After leaving the casualties, he continued to move his vehicle from bunker to bunker evacuating personnel trapped by the continually exploding rounds. During this time, he was constantly exposed to exploding rounds and flying shrapnel. Private First Class Perlmutter’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3348, Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, 12 April 1968

PIERCE, WILLIAM G.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 May 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class William G. Pierce, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the 60th Field Hospital, Fort Lewis, Wash., distinguished himself by heroism at Tacoma, Wash., on 27 may 1959. Upon being informed by a group of children that a little girl had fallen from the old Tacoma Dock, Tacoma, Wash., without hesitation or concern for his own safety and being completely unfamiliar with the depth and possible under currents, Sergeant Pierce removed his spectacles without which he has only 20/400 vision, and dived into the water under the pier to rescue the victim. In the approaching darkness he was forced to rise to the surface and dive a totatl of three times to a depth of between 10 to 15 feet in murky water with a strong outgoing tide, before the submerged and unconscious victim was finally located. He then swam with the victim to floating dock where a fellow soldier lifted the child up and onto the float. Sergeant Pierce then administered artificial respiration until police and fire department personnel arrived. Sergeant Pierce’s prompt and courageous action saved the little girl from drowning, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 33, Department of the Army, 10 September 1959

RADDATZ, LENARD
Private First Class, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 17 April 1954
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class Lenard Raddatz, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the 5015th Army Service Unit, Camp Atturbury, Indiana, distinguished himself by heroism at Edinburg, Indiana, on 17 April 1954. While driving home, he noticed an open excavation of the street. He stopped at the scene and saw a man helplessly trapped at the bottom of the excavation. The victim was submerged up to his chin in the mud and water at the bottom of the pit. Because of a broken high pressure water main, caused by a cave in of the walls of the excavation, the water and mud continued to rise. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Raddatz unhesitatingly entered the pit and attempted to stem the flow of water by improvised means. He succeeded in checking the flow of water until the supply was turned off, and then assisted in freeing the trapped man from the mud and removing him to a place of safety. Private Raddatz’s alert and courageous action in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 9 July 1954

RICHARDSON, STEPHEN B.
Second Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
45th Company, 4th Student Battalion, The Student Brigade, U.S. Army Infantry School
Date of Action: 11 May 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Second Lieutenant Stephen B. Richardson, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, as a member of the 45th Company, 4th Student Battalion, The Student Brigade, United States Army Infantry School, distinguished himself by heroism on 11 May 1964, near Fort Benning, Georgia. As an airborne student, Lieutenant Richardson was flying to a drop zone to perform his first of five qualifying parachute jumps when the aircraft developed engine trouble, crashed, and burned. After the initial impact, he succeeded in escaping from the burning wreckage. Then, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he re-entered the flaming aircraft to rescue students still trapped in the wreckage and continued his courageous efforts until the flames became too intense to continue the search. Lieutenant Richardson’s unselfish actions and heroic conduct in this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 40, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 11 December 1964

ROHR, WILLIAM J.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 April 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four William J. Rohr, Army Medical Service, (then Private First Class), United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as a member of Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, on 2 April 1964, near the Demilitarized Zone, Korea. When notified that a soldier had been injured by a mine, Specialist Rohr unhesitatingly proceeded to the minefield to participate in the medical evacuation of the wounded man. Upon arriving at the scene, he left his litter jeep at the fence, bravely traversed the live minefield, and reached the injured man who was located approximately fifty feet inside the mined area. With the assistance of another medical man on the scene, he helped place the injured soldier on the litter, made his way through the uncleared minefield, and succeeded in carrying the wounded man to the litter jeep for transportation to the dispensary. Specialist Rohr’s deep concern for a fellow soldier and heroic actions under these hazardous circumstances are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Rohr for heroism on 2 April 1964, as announced in General Orders Number 101, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, dated 30 July 1964)
General Orders: General Order number 19, Department of the Army, 28 May 1965

ROUT, RONALD A.
Private First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 22 February 1957
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Private First Class Ronald A. Rout, Army Medical Service, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism following the crash landing of a C-124 aircraft on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary on 22 February 1957. After the crash landing he assembled injured personnel, collected dry clothing and treated the survivors for shock and exposure to the icy water. The immediate and effective assistance rendered by Private Rout prior to the arrival of qualified medical Personnel prevented serious injury to many of the survivors. His unselfish and heroic actions were accomplished with complete disregard for his own safety or comfort and were rendered exceedingly difficult because of freezing cold, darkness and danger of being swept into the current by the steadily rising and fast flowing tide waters. Debris scattered about the crash site and jagged edges on the plane created an additional hazard to his personal safety. Private Rout’s exemplary action during this hazardous incident is indicative of a high degree of leadership ability and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 56, Department of the Army, 28 October 1957

SANCHEZ, LIBRADO P.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 November 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Librado P. Sanchez, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Chief Technician, Aid Station, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism Near Oui-Dong, Korea, on 4 November 1956. Upon learning that a fellow soldier had stepped on an anti-personnel mine and lay injured in an uncharted minefield, Sergeant Sanchez immediately proceeded to the scene of the accident. Despite the lack of a safe lane or mine detector, he courageously entered the hazardous area, made his precarious way to the suffering man and stemmed profuse bleeding by means of a tourniquet. After administering emergency aid, he assisted in evacuating the helpless man by litter to an awaiting ambulance for removal to a collecting station for further treatment. Sergeant Sanchez’ quick thinking and valorous actions resulted in the saving of a comrade’s life, reflecting utmost credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 39, Department of the Army, 31 July 1957

SARAJIAN, ROBERT B.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 December 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Robert B. Sarajian, Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism at Camp Young, Korea on 23 December 1966 while serving as Battalion Surgeon, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry, 2d Infantry Division. On this date he was on duty at the Camp Young Dispensary, when upon hearing a commotion outside, he left the dispensary to investigate. He observed a crowd of personnel around a telephone pole and a ladder leading up to a platform which was affixed to the telephone wires and the pole. There were two soldiers on the platform, one of them lying flat on the platform with his feet entangled in the high tension wires and apparently seriously injured. Thinking only of rendering medical assistance and with complete disregard of his own safety, Captain Sarajian proceeded to climb the swaying ladder. Upon reaching the platform, he discovered that the man had been accidentally electrocuted and had no pulse. He then administered cardiac resuscitation and managed to carry the soldier to the ground where he performed artificial respiration and transferred him to the dispensary. His quick thinking and prompt action enabled him to save the life of the injured soldier. Captain Sarajian’s gallantry and heroic action in the face of danger is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2d Infantry Division, and the United States Army. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal for heroism on 23 December 1966 as announced in General Orders Number 21, Headquarters 2d Infantry Division, dated 1 February 1967.)
General Orders: General Order number 18, Department of the Army, 18 April 1967

SCOTT, THOMAS I.
Specialist Fifth Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Thomas I. Scott, United States Army, a medical corpsman of the 215th General Dispensary, distinguished himself by heroism at Trois Fontaines, France on 8 May 1959. In response to an ambulance call, Specialist Scott found a soldier pinned and completely hidden under an overturned Army Engineer gradeall excavator. As three wrecker units strained to raise the huge piece of equipment in an effort to free the trapped man, gasoline and oil spilled from the machine, further increasing the danger involved. Immediately after the overstrained wrecker units had hoisted the vehicle approximately six inches, Specialist Scott dropped to the ground and worked himself under the several suspended tons of metal through broken glass, spilled gasoline and debris and managed to reach the injured man. Without regard for his own personal safety and with the full understanding that the slightest human or mechanical failure would be fatal for him, Specialist Scott persisted in his efforts until he freed the pinned operator and assisted him to safety. The high sense of duty, prompt courage, and brave actions displayed by Specialist Scott by risking his life in this emergency to save that of his fellow soldier are worthy of emulation, and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 38, Department of the Army, 12 October 1959

SHIERE, ROLAND L.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 October 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Roland L. Shiere, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Section, 554th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion (NIKE), distinguished himself by heroism on 7 October 1955 near Stanton, California. Sergeant First Class Shiere was summoned to the scene of an accident in which a civilian automobile had crashed into a large utility pole. The impact of the crash had sheared off the pole, leaving it precariously suspended by a single wire over the automobile. In addition, broken, but still “live” high voltage power lines were draped over an around the vehicle. Upon observing that the driver of the automobile was bleeding profusely from throat and arm wounds, Sergeant First Class Shiere, without regard for his own safety, entered the dangerous area to administer first aid to stem the flow of blood. He then supervised the removal of the injured person from the scene to a hospital. Sergeant First Class Shiere’s alertness and courage in the face of peril reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 33, Department of the Army, 24 June 1957

SMITH, JAMES W.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 April 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four James W. Smith, Army Medical Service, (then Private First Class), United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as a member of Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, on 2 April 1964, near the Demilitarized Zone, Korea. When notified that a soldier had been injured by a mine, Specialist Smith unhesitatingly proceeded to the minefield to participate in the medical evacuation of the wounded man. Upon arriving at the scene, he left his litter jeep at the fence, bravely traversed the live minefield, and reached the injured man who was located approximately fifty feet inside the mined area. With the assistance of another medical man on the scene, he helped place the injured soldier on the litter, made his way through the uncleared minefield, and succeeded in carrying the wounded man to the litter jeep for transportation to the dispensary. Specialist Smith’s deep concern for a fellow soldier and heroic actions under these hazardous circumstances are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Smith for heroism on 2 April 1964, as announced in General Orders Number 101, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, dated 30 July 1964)
General Orders: General Order number 15, Department of the Army, 28 April 1965

SMITH, JOHN H.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 April 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five John H. Smith, (then Private First Class), United States Army, while serving as a member of Company C, 7th Medical Battalion, United States Forces, Distinguished himself by heroism on 10 January 1965, in Korea. Specialist Smith unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in a rescue mission when he learned that a fellow soldier had accidentally stepped on a live mine, was seriously wounded, and trapped in the minefield. When the injured man was unable to hold on to a rope extended by an evacuation helicopter hovering over the minefield, Specialist Smith, followed by two soldiers carrying a stretcher, proceeded down a bank of a creek to get as close as possible to the victim. After placing the stretcher on the bank and crawling to the end of it, he was still 6 feet away from the wounded man. Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he bravely maneuvered himself through the hazardous remaining distance, reached the wounded soldier, and carried him back to the stretcher. With the assistance of other personnel on the scene, he then carried the wounded soldier to the landing site of the evacuation helicopter. Specialist Smith’s heroic conduct, ingenuity, and deep concern for a fellow soldier are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.(This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Specialist Smith for meritorious achievement on 10 January 1965 as announced in General Orders Number 20, Headquarters, 7th Infantry Division, APO San Francisco, 96207, dated 17 February 1965)
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 12 January 1966

SNOWDEN, HOUSTON D.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 26 May 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy is awarded to Sergeant Houston D. Snowden, Army Medical Service, Army of the United States, distinguished himself by heroic achievement on 26 May 1951 in the vicinity of Hangye, Korea. On that date he was attached as a medical aidman to Company F, 9th Infantry Regiment. The company was setting up a bivouac area when a loud explosion occurred nearby. Sergeant Snowden immediately ran in that direction. Informed that a soldier had wandered into a mine field and had been injured by an exploding mine, Sergeant Snowden, with complete disregard for his own safety, ran quickly into the center of the mined area to apply first aid to the injured man. His prompt action undoubtedly saved the man’s life. Sergeant Snowden then organized a litter team, led them into the danger area, and supervised the evacuation of the injured comrade. Sergeant Snowden’s heroic actions, reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 333, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 21 July 1951
Home of Record: West Virginia

SYPOLT, RICHARD
Specialist Four, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Richard Sypolt, (then Private First Class), United States Army, who, while serving as a Medical Aidman for the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor, 4th Armored Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 8 May 1967 during a field training exercise at Hohenfels, Germany. Two unidentified men from the 3d Infantry Division rushed into the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor mess hall and reported they had heard screams from the impact area of the M79 Grenade Launcher Range. Specialist Sypolt, a battalion aidman, who was present in the mess hall, immediately went to the motor pool and procured an armored ambulance, and accompanied by two other Medical Aidmen, rushed to the scene of the accident. Using the armored ambulance to protect themselves as much as possible from further explosions, the three aidmen maneuvered across the two hundred meters of dud-infested impact area to the aid of the injured men. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Sypolt dismounted the ambulance and proceeded on foot across the dud-strewn impact area to the first injured man. Specialist Sypolt and the other aidmen reached the wounded man and carried him across the dud-strewn area to the ambulance. Then, unhesitatingly, Specialist Sypolt crossed the area for a second time to the other injured man who was over fifty feet from the ambulance. When the second man had been loaded into the ambulance, the vehicle was carefully driven out of the impact area to an awaiting helicopter. Although the range was not in use at the time the two men were injured, the danger of personal injury due to grenade explosions was very real. Specialist Sypolt’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Sypolt per General Order Number 125, Headquarters, Fourth Armored Division, APO New York 09326, dated 1 April 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 50, Department of the Army, 26 September 1968

TIA, MALINI
Specialist Four, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 December 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Malini Tia, United States Army, AMEDS Company, Brooke General Hospital, Brooke Army Medical Center, distinguished himself by heroism on 15 December 1967. He displayed quick thinking and great courage at the scene of an automobile accident by entering a wrecked, burning, smoke-filled automobile, saving the lives of two children who were trapped in the back seat of the two door vehicle. He did this voluntarily, with complete disregard for his own safety. Upon arriving at the scene of the accident he heard a little girl crying “Mommy, Mommy!” from inside the burning vehicle. He reached through the flames and pulled one child to safety then tried to reach the other child. It was impossible to free the second child, because her foot was caught in the wreckage. The thick smoke and intense heat prevented Specialist Tia from getting into the car with the child to find the obstruction; thinking quickly, he threw himself under the car and reached up into it, found her foot, and loosened it. At the same time, a fellow soldier took the child by the shoulders and lifted her out of the vehicle. Specialist Tia took the little girl in his arms and held her himself while she was carried by a Military Police vehicle to Brooke General Hospital. There he stayed with her five hours, assisting with X-rays and subsequent treatment. Specialist Tia’s courageous action was in the highest tradition of valor and reflects great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Service, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 57, Department of the Army, 17 October 1968

TIERNEY, MARIAN A.
Lieutenant Colonel, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 July 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Marian A. Tierney, Army Nurse Corps, United States Army for heroism on 2 July 1966 in the Republic of Vietnam. On 2 July 1966, when the aircraft in which she was a passenger crashed, many people were injured and panic was beginning to affect the group. Colonel Tierney immediately took charge and through her extreme courage and fine example she inspired the others. After she had successfully cleared the aircraft, she began the task of treating all of the injured. Even though she was badly in need of medical aid, she refused to think about herself until everyone else had been taken care of and evacuated. Because of her outstanding courage, composure and thorough knowledge of medicine, she averted a near tragedy and saved the lives of many of the other passengers. Lieutenant Colonel Tierney’s heroic actions and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon herself, her unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1664, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, 13 April 1966

WHITENER, JAMES A.
Private, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 May 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), and pursuant to authority in AR 600-45, the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private James A. Whitener, Army Medical Service, United States Army a member of Medical Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, displayed heroism on 28 May 1951 in the vicinity of Yangjimal, Korea. A Netherlands soldier attempted to cross a swiftly flowing river to secure assistance for his wounded comrades, but the river was too swift and deep and the soldier soon found himself in danger of drowning. Private Whitener, upon hearing the soldier’s cry for help hesitantly threw his weapon aside and dashed into the water after the drowning soldier who was going down for the third time. Private Whitener expertly took him in tow and brought him to shore. The prompt and selfless action of Private Whitener in going to the aid of a comrade at great risk of his own life reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 173, Headquarters, 2d Infantry Division, 16 June 1951
Home of Record: North Carolina

WILHAM, JOHNNY S.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Johnny S. Wilham, (then Specialist Four), United States Army, who, while serving as a Medical Aidman for the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor, 4th Armored Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 8 May 1967 during a field training exercise at Hohenfels, Germany. Two unidentified men from the 3d Infantry Division rushed into the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor mess hall and reported they had heard screams from the impact area of the M79 Grenade Launcher Range. Specialist Wilham, a battalion aidman, who was present in the mess hall, immediately went to the motor pool and procured an armored ambulance, and accompanied by two other Medical Aidmen, rushed to the scene of the accident. Using the armored ambulance to protect themselves as much as possible from further explosions, the three aidmen maneuvered across the two hundred meters of dud-infested impact area to the aid of the injured men. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Wilham dismounted the ambulance and proceeded on foot across the dud-strewn impact area to the first injured man. Specialist Wilham and the other aidmen reached the wounded man and carried him across the dud-strewn area to the ambulance. Then, unhesitatingly, Specialist Wilham crossed the area for a second time to the other injured man who was over fifty feet from the ambulance. When the second man had been loaded into the ambulance, the vehicle was carefully driven out of the impact area to an awaiting helicopter. Although the range was not in use at the time the two men were injured, the danger of personal injury due to grenade explosions was very real. Specialist Wilham’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Wilham per General Order Number 125, Headquarters, Fourth Armored Division, APO New York 09326, dated 1 April 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 50, Department of the Army, 26 September 1968

WILLIAMS, FRANK C.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 January 1960
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Frank C. Williams, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the Medical Detachment (34160, Valley Forge General Hospital, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, distinguished himself by heroism on 24 January 1960, at Chester Springs, Pennsylvania. Sergeant Williams was sleeping at his home when he was awakened by a cry of “fire.” Upon being advised that a neighbor’s house was on fire, and one of the occupants trapped inside the burning building, immediately and without regard to his personal safety, he opened the front door of the house and crawled on hands and knees looking for the victim. After being unsuccessful in opening the door of the room where the victim was lying, Sergeant Williams left the burning building, placed a wet towel over his face and, with the assistance of three neighbors, re-entered the blazing building, forced open the blocked door, and removed the unconscious victim to safety. Sergeant Williams then immediately began to administer artificial respiration to the individual and continued for almost 1 hour until the ambulance arrived with a resuscitator. Sergeant Williams’ prompt and courageous action and unselfish efforts in this emergency are worthy of emulation, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 18, Department of the Army, 15 June 1960

WOOD LAMAR E.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 July 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant first Class LaMar E. Wood, Army Medical Service, United States Army, as a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, Medical Field Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas distinguished himself by heroism on 11 July 1964, on Lake Austin, Austin, Texas. Sergeant Wood was preparing to go boating on the lake when he observed a motor boat burst into flames and two persons leap into the water. Although the flames were already thirty feet high, he immediately set out in another boat to aid the victims. Ignoring the impending explosion of the blazing craft and with complete disregard for his own safety, he approached the seriously burned victims struggling in the water, lifted them into his boat, and transported them to the safety of the shore. Sergeant Wood’s heroic conduct, prompt action, and deep concern for his fellow man are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 19, Department of the Army, 28 May 1965

WRIGHT ALAN J.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 20 July 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Alan J. Wright, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism involving voluntary risk of life at Colorado Springs, Colorado on 20 July 1969. On that date Specialist Four Wright, while assigned to 5th Medical Battalion, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), Fort Carson, Colorado, happened to join a crowd of bystanders who were observing the torrential waters of a washed out roadbed, created by flash floods. During this period a man entered the water with an inner tube attempting to wade and drift in the swollen waters. As the man drifted with the current, the rushing waters caused him to lose control, trapped him under the ledge of the road pavement, and then continuously battered him into the banking, which was threatening collapse. At this point the would-be victim, realizing his precarious state, began frantically to cry out for help. Specialist Wright, hearing the plea for assistance, responded unhesitatingly and without regard for his own personal safety. By laying prostrate over the treacherous, crumbling, and undercut pavement and by lowering his head and shoulders into the trench, he was able to reach down and extract the man from the turbulent waters. Specialist Wright, through his foresight, initiative, timely judgment, and personal concern for his fellow man thereby extricated the victim from the dangerous waters and saved his life. By his courageous action and humanitarian regard for his fellow man, in the dedication of his service to his country, Specialist Wright has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 50, Department of the Army, 8 September 1970

WYMER, RALPH M.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 October 1950
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Ralph M. Wymer, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 112th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. On 23 October 1950, a civilian lineman working on a power line touched a live wire and suffered severe shock. Seeing the man suspended by his safety belt, with clothing afire, Captain Wymer, without hesitation, climbed the ladder, put out the fire, and attempted to cut the live wire. When the poser was finally turned off and the victim lowered to the ground, he administered first aid treatment. Captain Wymer’s courageous act reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 16, Department of the Army, 20 March 1951

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